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View Diary: Cancel My @$%ing HuffPo Account, Kos (215 comments)

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  •  As a matter of fact, it is. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    HairyTrueMan

    I've been using my first initial and last name to comment on the Internet for more than 20 years. It hasn't been a problem for me so far. If anything, it might make me pause now and then before saying something that I might not be willing to stand behind. Would that more people on the Internet were willing to do the same.

    Admittedly, my name is so common that I'm essentially unfindable on the Internet for practical purposes. If I were named Throckmorton W. Gillenwater I might have a different perspective on the value of protecting my brand, so to speak. At the same time, though, I think too many people say too much stupid shit on the Internet in general, and if the thought of future job interviews dissuades people from posting some fresh brain turd somewhere, I don't see how that's a bad thing at all. Freedom of speech doesn't mean speech has no consequences.

    •  It goes beyond anonymity. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      elfling, splashy, mahakali overdrive

      Huffington Post would essentially be getting free access to my Facebook information, not just my name and proof of identity. What groups do I belong to, what movies I like, who my friends are, etc. It goes beyond verifying that I'm a real person who stands behind what I say or write.

      And if I'm reading this correctly, you think it's okay to deny someone employment because you don't like their politics. For example, suppose you apply for a job at my company and although you are highly qualified, I decide not to hire you because I'm a Republican and you're a fan of President Obama. Hypothetically speaking of course. Is that an example of the consequences of free speech?

      If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.

      by HairyTrueMan on Wed Dec 11, 2013 at 11:43:30 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  No. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        HairyTrueMan, Keninoakland

        Connecting a site to Facebook doesn't just wantonly open the kimono. The site requesting the connection (the "application" in Facebook parlance) has to specifically request the permissions it wants, and you have to agree to those permissions. Down below I posted what information HuffPo gets: your name, gender, profile picture, user ID, list of friends, birthday, current city, and any information you've marked as Public. HuffPo specifically does not get access to your group memberships, your lists of movies and other favorites, or any information about your friends other than their user IDs, names and profile photos. There are sites that ask for all those things, but Facebook doesn't.

        For example, suppose you apply for a job at my company and although you are highly qualified, I decide not to hire you because I'm a Republican and you're a fan of President Obama. Hypothetically speaking of course. Is that an example of the consequences of free speech?
        Yeah, actually, it is. A prospective employer can choose not to hire you if he sees you on TV at a protest march, or reads a letter you wrote to the editor of the paper, or reads something your friend wrote about you on her blog ten years ago, or sees you walk into a liquor store. The mistake you make is in presuming that I think that's "okay," which is a strange leap of logic to make. I think no one should ever make employment decisions based on anything that doesn't directly pertain to the job. Employers who do that are poor employers and their businesses should fail, and no doubt many of them do fail. But it does happen, and it's ridiculous to think you can stop it from happening short of using a fake ID in all of your dealings and having no friends and wearing a mask every time you leave the house. That's no way to live life.

        There is much in life that is beyond our control, but we all make choices every day, and those choices have consequences as well. I've found that when someone seeks to be insulated from the consequences of their words or actions, it's almost always because what they're taking (attention, people's time, etc.) is worth more than what they're giving back.

        •  I addressed this in item #4. (0+ / 0-)

          These rules change all the time. And often your settings will change too. Regardless, my friends list alone is enough for me to avoid linking my FB account to another site. It's none of their fucking business who my FB friends are.

          Regarding the second point, I agree that it's a bad way to hire people. But it does happen, which is reason enough to censor yourself on the internet. For instance, I'll be careful to avoid supporting Marijuana legalization because a potential employer might think I'm a drug addict. And I'm going to be very careful to write nothing but good things about the insurance industry since I've worked in it for so long. Without anonymity, I'm not going to write shit about shit in a public forum because the security of my family is more important than giving my opinion to strangers on the internet.

          Granted, there are unlimited people who hide behind anonymity to be complete jerks. But those people are easy to spot and can be banned pretty quickly.

          If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.

          by HairyTrueMan on Wed Dec 11, 2013 at 12:33:25 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

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