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View Diary: Opening the Door for the Neoliberals: Fault Lines in the New Deal Coalition (63 comments)

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  •  Intereesting analysis (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lotlizard

    The thing that seems to be missing is that the corporate assault on the Wagner Act was almost immediate.  In a prime example of past is prologue, the passage of the Wisconsin and Colorado Labor Peace Acts in 1939 (I believe) and 1943 marked the shift from national action to action at the state level to gut the major provisions of the Wagner Act.   Each of these pieces of legislation were also precursors to the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947.  Most importantly, they were the test cases for a new push towards the "right to work" movement of the late 1940's and early 1950's which continues to plague organized labor today.  Both pieces of legislation were made possible by an electoral shift in the states that allowed Republicans to gain the legislative power necessary to put their plans into action.

    •  Taft-Hartley didn't come out of thin air. (0+ / 0-)

      There had always been corporate warfare against unions. The new deal had a fairly narrow window of opportunity. What made it possible to pass T-H on a national level was the shift of the southern bloc to an alliance with the Republicans. That of course is now the most militantly anti-union region of the country.

    •  A precocious li'l kid, I read the Reader's Digests (0+ / 0-)

      … my dad kept on top of the water closet in the bathroom.

      I was too young to realize that if something was in print, very often there were people behind that something with ulterior motives, somebody willing to go to a whole lot of trouble to get you to believe what they wanted you to believe. (Sorry about indulging in a bit of Buffy Speak here).

      Anyway, while in the bathroom I read a Reader's Digest article about the UAW vs. Kohler bathroom fixture strike — basically amounting to propaganda for so-called Right-to-Work laws.

      Being what is nowadays recognized as an Aspie, I ended up "playing back verbatim" what I had read to my dad, getting into an argument with him. (He was very pro-labor.)

      Only years later, when I was in college, did the question I should have asked occur to me: "Hey, Dad, you're a Democrat, so why do you even subscribe to a right-wing rag like the Reader's Digest?"

      (Answer: gift subscription from one of his sisters who converted from traditional Asian religion to Roman Catholicism and would later fall prey to right-wing hucksters.)

      The Dutch kids' chorus Kinderen voor Kinderen wishes all the world's children freedom from hunger, ignorance, and war. ♥ ♥ ♥ Forget Neo — The One is Minori Urakawa

      by lotlizard on Wed Dec 18, 2013 at 01:10:07 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Bottom line: Reader's Digest was already promoting (0+ / 0-)

        … Right-to-Work laws to millions of Americans all through the 1950s, right alongside Norman Rockwell imagery of America and the Good Housekeeping seal.

        The Dutch kids' chorus Kinderen voor Kinderen wishes all the world's children freedom from hunger, ignorance, and war. ♥ ♥ ♥ Forget Neo — The One is Minori Urakawa

        by lotlizard on Wed Dec 18, 2013 at 01:18:38 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

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