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View Diary: Free Money for the Poor--Could This Approach Work in the United States? (112 comments)

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  •  Nixon is turning out to be one of the most (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Jasmine Van Pelt, Odysseus

    liberal politicians in the last 50 years.

    What does that say about Democrats?  My god, the man was a neurotic, lying maniac and his policies were more beneficial to the general public and the poor than today's Democrats.

    Clean Water.
    Clean Air.
    Community Block Grants.
    Public Health proposal.
    Negative Income Tax proposal.

    "The law is meant to be my servant and not my master, still less my torturer and my murderer." -- James Baldwin. July 11, 1966.

    by YucatanMan on Mon Dec 30, 2013 at 05:42:16 PM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  It speaks volumes about the Republicans back then. (0+ / 0-)

      Especially the 17 in the Senate,
      and the 97 in the house that voted with
      their Democratic colleagues to override Nixon's veto.

      Seriously, a closer examination of much legislation,
      especially the truly bi partisan veto proof majorities
      by which so much was passed, is very instructive.
      The Republicans were not all anti government back in those days,
      and a savvy politician knows when to adopt popular stances,
      and how to adapt to changing circumstances.

      I will agree with you that some progress was achieved,
      but differ in who exactly should get the credit and or blame.
      The 'most liberal politician in the last 50 years'  
      dragged his feet in funding the CWA, and other bills, so much
      that he inspired further legislation to address such wilful spite.

      Historical revisionism is so useful, now more than ever before.

      Thanks for all of your efforts.

      •  Given it is late, I cannot tell if (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        barleystraw

        this is simple commentary or nasty sarcasm. If you think I'm a Republican or whatever, well, just say so. Then I could be appropriately insulted, if that is your aim. I just can't tell.

        Historical revisionism is so useful, now more than ever before.

        Thanks for all of your efforts.

        What this does is speak volumes to how radical Republicans are today. AND how far right Democrats have moved today. Are they fighting loud and clear for the workers and for the unemployed?   Yeah, a couple are. Where are the other couple hundred plus?

        If Democrats were taking the fight to the Republicans - offensive, not defensive (although we have to admire Harry Reid's recent moves after all his years of dithering) like Harry Truman did, this public discussion would be a whole lot different. We have to face it: we're loaded up to the gills in corporate democrats. And they're enabling Republican stagnation.

        Historical revisionism is so useful, now more than ever before.

        Thanks for all of your efforts.

        "The law is meant to be my servant and not my master, still less my torturer and my murderer." -- James Baldwin. July 11, 1966.

        by YucatanMan on Tue Dec 31, 2013 at 12:13:35 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  P.S. Does Obama know what a veto is? n/t (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        barleystraw

        "The law is meant to be my servant and not my master, still less my torturer and my murderer." -- James Baldwin. July 11, 1966.

        by YucatanMan on Tue Dec 31, 2013 at 12:14:52 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Let's see... what have I left out? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mimi

        http://www.pbs.org/...

        Despite the opposition of many men in his administration, Nixon increased the number of female appointments to administration positions. He created a Presidential Task Force on Women's Rights. He asked the Justice Department to bring sex discrimination suits under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. And he ordered the Labor Department to add sex discrimination provisions to the guidelines for its Office of Federal Contract Compliance.
        The president sent dozens of environmental proposals to Congress, including the Clean Air Act of 1970, perhaps one of the most significant pieces of environmental legislation ever passed. He also created two new agencies, the Department of Natural Resources and the Environmental Protection Agency, to oversee environmental matters.
        In 1972, he vetoed the Clean Water Act, which he generally supported, because Congress had boosted its cost to $18 billion. When Congress overrode his veto, he used his presidential powers to impound half of the money.

        In many ways, Nixon's New Federalism paralleled Conservatives' desires for a smaller, less costly federal government. But an element of true radicalism was evident in two of his most controversial domestic proposals -- revenue sharing and the Family Assistance Plan.

        Has Obama been that aggressive in expanding rights? Gay rights have taken major leaps under Obama, but he had to "evolve" first. And most of the leaps were court-ordered, not administration initiatives.

        I'm not a fan of crooked Tricky Dick as a person nor of his many neuroses, criminal acts and savage, illegal bombing tactics, plus treason for negotiating with the North Vietnamese while Johnson was still President.

        But.  Look at the expansion of liberal (or radical, if you will) programs during his time in office. There's just no question that this was a time of vast expansion of rights and of federal enforcement of many issues which improved the lives of all Americans. Vast changes took place during his crooked administration.

        If you are being nasty, no reason for that. Look at the full record of "change" during the Nixon years and compare it to now. Only administration actions, not court cases.  

        By the way, those who turned 18 during the Nixon years are pretty much reliably more democratic today. Might be because we want more progressive policies taking place.

        "The law is meant to be my servant and not my master, still less my torturer and my murderer." -- James Baldwin. July 11, 1966.

        by YucatanMan on Tue Dec 31, 2013 at 12:28:20 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Wasn't trying to be nasty, just making an (0+ / 0-)

          observation. I have noticed several commenters
          lauding Nixon's 'liberality' here at the GOS.
          It wasn't me that typed "the most liberal politician
          in the last 50 years" as a statement of truth. In fact,
          I fully understood that you were just venting hyperbolically.

          Just as those who praise FDR forget the interments,
          or any of TR's foreign policies, because of Yellowstone.
          Really, pick your own historical revision that applies.
          Will there ever be a shortage? I don't think so.
          And that includes our present and all future POTUS.

          Nixon wasn't a liberal, despite many 'liberal' policies
          being adopted while he was POTUS. If that is the
          metric, then fine. I still question his overall actions
          as they tended to reflect his personal and now very
          public fears and political inclinations and practices.
          Which eventually cost him, and his party, everything,
          At least politically speaking, for a generation or so.

          It wasn't a Republican mayor that presided over
          the days of rage in Chicago back in '68. Along with
          moderate Republicans, many of the Democrats were
          very conservative, especially in the South, which had
          yet to undergo its full transition under Nixon's strategy.

          I was merely observing that there were still moderate
          or even 'liberal' Republicans that forced Nixons hand.
          Those who decry the modern two party system candidate
          offerings as essentially the same, a critique with some merit,
          would have loved their choices between Nixon and Humphrey.

          I think that choice, or rather lack of choice, led directly
          to the alienation of so many politically active then,
          and thus to the 'Reagan Democrat' phenomena that
          shifted the overton window for two generations or more.

          Do you believe that the riots and protests of that era
          had any electoral impact whatsoever? Were those
          electoral results reactions based on unfounded fears?
          Perhaps we should ask the Black Panthers what Nixon was?

          Many would say McGovern the most liberal in the recent past.
          The historical record shows who won that election.
          I am not so sure as to the manifold reasons why, though.
          It would appear that we are a deeply divided and conflicted
          people on the surface of it, though we all agree
          on so much. I wonder how Senators. Sanders and
          Warren will compare in the future to Eugene McCarthy?

          Thanks for all of your efforts.

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