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View Diary: Two House Democrats, Mike McIntyre and Carolyn McCarthy, will retire (113 comments)

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  •  Not any closer, though (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bananapouch1

    to her being able to do anything with it.

    Also, 60% is a mighty optimistic estimate. I seriously have no idea why McIntyre ever chose to be a Democrat. His profile doesn't match up at all. Maybe in the '60s he would have fit in better, but now...

    •  The South took long to adjust. (0+ / 0-)

      It started voting Republican in pres. elections in 1964/1968, but down the ballot, it really took decades to adjust, depending on existing divides - racial, urban vs. rural etc. Stats like AR had that little divides that they didn't make the switch until the 2000s.

      •  There's still a ton of Dems in the south (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        psychicpanda

        Who don't vote Democratic at nearly every level of government anymore.  In my state a large swathe of the FL Panhandle is made up of counties where Dems outnumber GOP voters 4:1 or greater yet still go GOP very heavily at every level except municipal elections and to some extent county elections.  I never really understood it.  If a realignment happened and suddenly the GOP became the more progressive party my voter registration would change real fast.

        Intelligence agencies keep things secret because they often violate the rule of law or of good behavior. -Julian Assange-

        by ChadmanFL on Wed Jan 08, 2014 at 03:13:04 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Last gasp of the Democratic South. (0+ / 0-)

          First, they voted R at the presidential level. Then they elected R governors. Then, mostly after the 1994 elections, they also elected R representatives/senators. The state legislatures took longest to flip - AL only gained a GOP majority in 2010, and AR in 2012. The process varied from state to state, but ultimately it produced the same result. West Virginia is an interesting case - used to be a deeply Democratic state, supporting Carter in 1980, Dukakis in 1988, but from 2000 went red at the presidential level, voting 62% for Romney in 2012. Still, Democrats control the legislature non-stop since Reconstruction, and both Senators have been Democrats since 1959 - which is the longest Democratic single-party streak of any state. Nick Rahall is still the representative of the state's reddest district (65% Romney).

          •  Rahall's is the bluest below the presidential (0+ / 0-)

            level.

            ...better the occasional faults of a government that lives in a spirit of charity, than the consistent omissions of a government frozen in the ice of its own indifference. -FDR, 1936

            by James Allen on Thu Jan 09, 2014 at 06:10:16 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  N Rahall is a very good example to see (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              James Allen

              He is just the last Democratic incumbent in the US House keeping a fight in R+double digit districts, and still he has been able to keep the less conservative voting record of all them. Even he is not a blue dog.

              It should make us to think about the real need to have as conservative voting record being a Democrat in R+, even in R+ high.

              •  he's still conservative on cultural issues (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                abgin

                and the environment.

                ...better the occasional faults of a government that lives in a spirit of charity, than the consistent omissions of a government frozen in the ice of its own indifference. -FDR, 1936

                by James Allen on Thu Jan 09, 2014 at 07:25:57 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

            •  Jim Matheson's is even redder (0+ / 0-)

              There, Mitt Romney won 67.2% of the vote. He chose to retire to avoid a humiliating defeat and to remain undefeated.

              •  I was talking about out of the districts in West (0+ / 0-)

                Virginia.  But Matheson's district wasn't really that Republican, if you look at earlier elections. It went so high for Romney because it was in Utah, if you catch my meaning.

                ...better the occasional faults of a government that lives in a spirit of charity, than the consistent omissions of a government frozen in the ice of its own indifference. -FDR, 1936

                by James Allen on Thu Jan 09, 2014 at 07:24:55 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

    •  Because he's still less conservative (0+ / 0-)

      than the troglodytes in the southern Republican caucus. Plus his district still has a massive Dem party registration edge even today as does most of the state. Robeson County is like 75% D last I saw.

    •  When he was first elected... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      David Nir

      he COULD NOT have been elected as a Republican.  He couldn't have won.  His district was only leaning D but his base was in Robeson, Bladen, and Columbus Counties which were 80% D at the time.  And that was just in the mid 1990s.

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