Skip to main content

View Diary: Would You Get A New Hip? (46 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  What you want to do is strengthen your muscles, (9+ / 0-)

    so there's less stress on the bone. Exercise will be necessary, even if you do get the hip replaced. If aspirin helps, take that. My mother had her first hip replaced at about age 62. It lasted her until she died at 98. The second hip was replaced when she was 80. That one also lasted until she died and actually got rid of a lot of other pains (knees,etc). I'm not sure they're making them to the same quality. You might ask how long today's models are expected to last. A friend had to have the same hip done twice because the first surgery cracked the bone into which the pin was inserted and she ended up with a leg two inches shorter. Then she had knees done and last year the other hip. For some reason the bone had deteriorated in just over a year (if the x-rays were to be believed). A gentleman down the street had his hip replaced about 20 years ago. It never healed right and he had it done again. Sepsis set in and he eventually died from that. It's my guess a lot depends on how quickly a person heals.

    Pain is not necessarily an accurate signal of disease.

    The quality of medical "appliances" seems to vary quite a bit. There are now ads in the papers seeking patients whose surgeries were not a success because the appliances were bad. I suspect one of the reasons the ACA programs seeks to tax the appliances themselves is so they can begin to track which prove successful over time and which don't. Patients whose appliances fail aren't likely to know the brand when it comes to a hip or knee joint.
    Do the surgeons keep track? Ask.

    Obamacare at your fingertips: 1-800-318-2596; TTY: 1-855-889-4325

    by hannah on Mon Jan 13, 2014 at 07:18:14 AM PST

    •  Smoking has a very serious impact on healing - if (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      hannah

      anyone is looking for an additional reason/motivation to quit, they might keep that in mind.



      Is it true? Is it kind? Is it necessary? . . . and respect the dignity of every human being.

      by Wee Mama on Mon Jan 13, 2014 at 04:23:29 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Did not know that. Thanks. n/t (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Wee Mama

        Obamacare at your fingertips: 1-800-318-2596; TTY: 1-855-889-4325

        by hannah on Tue Jan 14, 2014 at 04:50:40 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Very big impact - some surgeons will work with (0+ / 0-)

          patients to quit in advance with a pledge to stay off cigarettes for at least the initial period of healing. A couple of links, here, and here. A money quote:

          How does smoking affect my skin and wound healing?

          Smoking causes blood vessels to become smaller.  The smaller vessels have a harder time carrying oxygen, nutrients, and healing factors to the wound.  This can cause the wound healing process to take longer.

          Carbon monoxide is a poison from smoking that enters your blood cells.  This poison lowers the level of oxygen in your blood.  Oxygen is vital to your healing. It only takes 3 full days of no smoking to get rid of all the carbon monoxide in your blood.  It is vital to quit smoking for at least 3 days before your surgery so that the oxygen can build back up in your blood stream.

          The first link has numbers showing that smokers took 50% longer to heal.

          I hate the tobacco companies. They stole my mother from me.



          Is it true? Is it kind? Is it necessary? . . . and respect the dignity of every human being.

          by Wee Mama on Tue Jan 14, 2014 at 05:40:03 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site