Skip to main content

View Diary: UPDATED: Coming to Terms with Myself as an Introvert (246 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  I am an introvert and like it. (18+ / 0-)

    I do not get my energy from other people. Just the opposite. Call me a snob but I find most people boring. I love it when I can connect with someone that I enjoy their intellect, sense of humor (most important) , their interest in the more eclectic things in life, etc..

    It isn't often that I meet an interesting person especially where I live now in the middle of redneck country.

    •  I agree with you. (12+ / 0-)

      I find people friendly and mostly kind but not interesting to me. With many of my acquaintances and even my friends I find interactions dutiful and irritating.  I thought I was a meanie but maybe I am just an introvert.

      Everyone! Arms akimbo! 68351

      by tobendaro on Mon Jan 13, 2014 at 03:28:59 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  It is really hard to be open to dullness. (10+ / 0-)

        The most irritating aspect of extroverts that I find is that it is all about them. Yak, yak about their lives and never any inquiries about me. I don't require attention but do think relationships are a two way street not one.

        •  I don't care about what they are (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          AJayne, highacidity

          interested in.  I don't want to know about tv shows, celebrities or what any famous person is doing.  They read novels I would never look at, they shop and the most irritating to me is the waste in their lives while they complain they have no money.  Everyone whines like crazy then does exactly what they were whining about.  I never get it.  I like challenge not pap.  As I read this back I do feel it is snobby but it is what I feel.  I have friends who are petrified to retire because they will have nothing to do.  Huh?  How can your life be that boring?

          Everyone! Arms akimbo! 68351

          by tobendaro on Tue Jan 14, 2014 at 04:24:28 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  You're correct; most people ARE boring! (7+ / 0-)

      ;-)  The next T-shirt I get to go along with my 50+year fascination with genealogy research says:

      I'm a Genealogist
      You'd be more
      interesting
      if you were dead.
      I'm an extreme introvert, also find the majority of people boring beyond my ability to define, and I'm perfectly happy and content to not speak to a living soul for weeks on end (and often don't!).  I must have at least two dozen major interests, and twice that for minor interests.  I was doing "full immersion learning" long before I found out there was a term for it.

      The internet is a great tool for genealogy research, and where I can find like-minded people who also love to do research (emphasis on doing research, finding documents, analyzing info, reading and deciphering old handwriting, even Gothic penmanship, etc., and discussing same and helping people half a world away, often in foreign countries, NOT copying someone else's info that has repeated an error that's been copied dozens of times by others and is totally wrong; copying is NOT research!) - and share a love of multiple topics of interest that go along with the info, some of which are intertwined and an extension of original topics of interest.  Research into the past is an interesting journey full of detours and odd little paths that lead to what then becomes vital trivia info to know to accomplish certain research.

      I'm well aware of the fact that most people think genealogy research is a dull subject, but since it fulfills my need for acquiring knowledge on multiple subjects that are often intertwined, or analyzing data from several different perspectives and sometimes discussing the results with someone in another country or another state, it's endlessly fascinating to me.  My brother's eyes glaze over.  He likes the end result, but the path to get the info - which is often more interesting than the info itself - is of no interest to him.

      I find kaffe klatches and gossip to be better than a sleeping pill.  I'm most assuredly not a gregarious hausfrau type of woman.

      :-)

      I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

      by NonnyO on Mon Jan 13, 2014 at 06:01:50 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  i agree (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        NonnyO, SuWho, kalika, shaharazade

        I am probably not as into the process as you but I do see the fun and the value of it. I watched the series with Henry Louis Gates where he traced the lineage of several celebrities. I found it fascinating.

        I think a lot of people are just plain lazy which contributes to them having nothing to offer. My boss is that way. He is as dull as they come. I have known him for ten yrs and have never had a conversation that was particularly interesting. One reason is he believes in religion and I don't. That leads to an impasse most of the time.

        •  :-) I think Gates... (4+ / 0-)

          ... is into the DNA studies, isn't he?  I've never seen his show, but might have seen a preview.  [My TV is now permanently off and I watch maybe six shows per week on Hulu now, at most.  Over the last two summers it's only been one show one hour per week.  I loathe most TV.]

          If Gates show is similar to someone else's, they're doing the yDNA studies with single surnames that come down in the paternal line.  The maternal mtDNA apparently can't be tested much beyond the "Seven Daughters of Eve" and single surname testing can't be done on mtDNA.  Single surname yDNA testing just isn't possible when doing genealogy research in the Scandinavian countries or Iceland or the Faroe Islands where the patronymic naming system is/was used.  Records only go back to the 1600s if one is lucky.  yDNA goes back to Viking times in male testing and those results can be compared; they just can't be labeled by a surname since they didn't exist at that point in history.  Interestingly, Iceland has their country's database online so people can compare their genealogies to find out if they're related, or how far back they might be related.  Their genealogy research started ages ago when they started keeping track of genetically inherited diseases going clear back to Viking times.  They can actually document their ancestors going back to the time of the sagas.  If one knows how to research in records where the Scandinavian patronymic naming system is used, and if records were kept accurately, it's quite interesting - and one never loses women because they keep their own names their entire lives.

          Occasionally in England there are a few birth, marriage, death records that go back to the 1500s (in one of my English lines, back to the 1400s), and if a name connects to a famous family contemporary records can get a person back farther in the records (one of the latter gets one line of one of my English families back to 1149).

          Still, most countries didn't have laws mandating keeping track of births, marriages, and deaths until well into the 1600s or early 1700s, so that is the normal time range of documented genealogies most of the time.

          There were some earlier census and tax rolls, and there are two sets of records in Yorkshire that made that part of me that loves etymology just swoon for joy.

          Transcriptions of the Subsidy Rolls (Poll Tax) for 1379 for the West Riding, the Ainsty and the Howdenshire wapentake.
          A transcription of the Subsidy Rolls for the Ainsty wapentake from the 16th century.
          There is/was a show on TV called Who Do You Think You Are? and I sort of kept up on that one for a while.  They did a lot of extra traveling that is not necessary for most people to do, so the areas of anyone's ancestors they chose to highlight pretty much only went back to the Civil War era.  Not far at all.  The one they went back farther on was Brooke Shields and her genealogy connects to the French royal families waaaaay back when.  That was interesting.

          I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

          by NonnyO on Mon Jan 13, 2014 at 08:05:08 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  Aaaaah, yeah.... (5+ / 0-)

          I've encountered the same thing:

          I have known him for ten yrs and have never had a conversation that was particularly interesting. One reason is he believes in religion and I don't. That leads to an impasse most of the time.
          Can't have a meaningful conversation without the topic reverting to faith of some kind..., which limits any interaction to "Hi, how are you?  I'm fine, thank you.  Have a good day."  Two ships passing in the night.  [I don't believe in religion either.]

          I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

          by NonnyO on Mon Jan 13, 2014 at 08:09:14 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site