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View Diary: Addicted to Wealth: Why More Is Never Enough (150 comments)

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  •  Exactly (2+ / 0-)
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    Sparhawk, Happy Days

    That's around $8500 after taxes, or $708/month, or easily enough to feed two adults (or one adult and two children) a quite rich Western diet with $300/month left over for discretionary spending.

    If you have to support two adults and a kid, you might want to look into one of those cheaper apartments, or perhaps ask your spouse/partner to work part-time.

    "Let’s just move on, treat everybody with firmness, fairness, dignity, compassion and respect. Let’s be Marines." - Sgt. Maj Michael Barrett on DADT repeal

    by kyril on Mon Jan 20, 2014 at 11:18:29 AM PST

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    •  Ok, that's food and shelter. (1+ / 0-)
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      EastcoastChick

      Utilities? Insurance (health, renters, auto), transportation? Even if someone doesn't have a car and need to pay to park it, BART and muni aren't free.  State income tax?

      Clothes? Medicine? Eyeglasses? OTC meds? Oh heck, toilet paper...? Sales tax on purchases? Fees for government services, like driver's licenses?  

      I hope they don't have a cat.

      Does the kid get a new toy now and then? What about school supplies?  A trip to the Museum of Children's Art for her birthday? All this stuff adds up fast.

      I've been in some of those cheaper "quaint" inner Sunset apartments. They're tiny, and it's not a great place for kids to play on steep hilly streets.  Those aren't intended for families with kids.

      Everyday life requires more than just a roof and food.

      When you write here in various comments about what stuff cost, you don't pay any attention to everything else that has to be considered. You talk about comfortable homes, cars and lifestyles without seeming to realize that houses and cars require taxes, insurance, maintenance and unexpected repairs.

      You talk about a "middle class" family earning $50K but only allow for food and shelter.

      Well, that's not middle class.  That's working poor. Those folks can provide hardly any of the basic things their child needs, much less themselves.

      If you do the math, it does not even begin to add up, not by a long shot.  Even the most rudimentary household budget would prove that.

      © grover


      So if you get hit by a bus tonight, would you be satisfied with how you spent today, your last day on earth? Live like tomorrow is never guaranteed, because it's not. -- Me.

      by grover on Tue Jan 21, 2014 at 01:30:31 AM PST

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      •  $300/month (0+ / 0-)
        Utilities? Insurance (health, renters, auto), transportation? Even if someone doesn't have a car and need to pay to park it, BART and muni aren't free.  State income tax?

        Clothes? Medicine? Eyeglasses? OTC meds? Oh heck, toilet paper...? Sales tax on purchases? Fees for government services, like driver's licenses?

        is a lot of money.

        I take home about $500/month. My dad has been sending me an additional $500. My rent (which includes utilities) is $760. So on $240/month I'm managing to pay for food, transportation, and all the assorted other necessities of life. I'm poor, but I'm comfortable.

        Our hypothetical family has more than that left over after spending $400 on food. I suppose if they want massive quantities of fancy toilet paper, they can spend $5 less on food.

        "Let’s just move on, treat everybody with firmness, fairness, dignity, compassion and respect. Let’s be Marines." - Sgt. Maj Michael Barrett on DADT repeal

        by kyril on Tue Jan 21, 2014 at 11:32:14 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

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