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View Diary: Cuomo tried gifting private university $200M for football stadium (290 comments)

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  •  Yeah, I thought deBlasio and Cuomo were (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    satrap, avsp

    BFF's

    •  Not hardly (26+ / 0-)

      One is the scion of a wealthy political family, the other started from practically nothing and lived according to an extremely modest middle-class lifestyle (with both kids in public school) until a few weeks ago. Since DeBlasio ran Hillary's first Senate campaign he's come to know everybody in state politics, but I sorely doubt Andrew Cuomo wants pressure from the left like he's going to get from DiBlasio for the next 6-12 years.

      •  Actually... (3+ / 0-)

        ...I read a New York magazine this article this morning (doctor's office, my excuse) detailing a close and good relationship between the mayor and the gov.  DiBlasio worked for Cuomo for a couple of years at HUD. We here may not be big fans of Andrew Cuomo, but it's most likely that he and the mayor will manage things fairly well?

        I'm from the Elizabeth Warren wing of the Democratic Party

        by voicemail on Tue Jan 21, 2014 at 02:05:09 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  That remains to be seen. (6+ / 0-)

          De Blasio spent the morning today discussing his pre-K program - and the tax increases on the wealthy of NYC to pay for it.  This was hours before Cuomos 2014 budget presentation - and Team Cuomo has made it clear they have no intention of going along with De Blasios plan to raise income taxes in the city.

          Then, Cuomo did his budget presentation - making a counter-proposal to do statewide pre-K without a peep on how he would fund it - and didn't mention De Blasio once.

          They may have had a rosy relationship at one point, but I suspect that with Cuomo being such an epic 3rd Wayer and De Blasio - at least so far - seeming to be an actual liberal, that relationship isn't all that rosy.  Scuttlebutt around the Capitol seems to confirm this - their staffs have been at each other more than a few times behind the scenes from what I've heard.

          •  Cuomo won't be Gov for 6-12 years (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Darth Stateworker

            He will be the Not-Hillary alternative in the Dem primary in 2016.  Given the antipathy for Hillary that surfaced during 2008, it won't surprise me if he wins.  It would be an uphill fight, but he would appeal more in the south, where the Clintons are the great satan.  

            It will be interesting to see where black voters go in 2016, or if they'll turnout in the primary.  It was this turnout across the south, and their 90-10 majority for Obama, that kept Hillary off the ticket in 2008.  Without Obama, will they return to the Clinton fold?  

            How about that for a choice in 2016?  Bad or Worse, or a Republican?  But, which one is which if you're a liberal?  Hard to know, since the Clintons are so slippery.  At least we know where Cuomo stands.

            •  Maybe (0+ / 0-)

              Cuomo is still pretty darn tight with the Clintons.  As such, I have my doubts that he would try to torpedo Hillary.

              On the other hand, he's an underhanded, ambitious, shady, slimy weasel of the first magnititude, so even if he is tight with the Clintons, I could see him trying to torpedo Hillary if he thinks he can win the primary.  I think that will be the key - if he thinks he can win, he'll do it.  Otherwise, he'll keep his cushy and safe job as NY governor until 2020 or 2024 - unless Hillary (or the primary winner if it isn't her) picks him as her running mate.

              Honestly, given a primary choice between just the two of them - ugh.  I don't want to even think of what a disaster that would be for liberalism.  2 3rd Wayers fighting over which one can be the most 3rd Way, while trying to sell what they're pitching as "mainstream liberalism."

      •  Remains to be seen. (10+ / 0-)

        They go way back, since Andrew made Bill the Regional Director (NY/NJ) for HUD in 1997, well before he ran HRC's Senate campaign.

        To DeBlasio's credit, he's pushing back on the pre-K funding right now, but this story is far from over. If I had to put my money on who's going to win, right now I'd bet on Cuomo. Sorry.

        "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself."........ "The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little." (yeah, same guy.)

        by sidnora on Tue Jan 21, 2014 at 02:10:05 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  According to De Blasio they are - that's how (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        sethtriggs

        he promised to get his over $500k income tax passed through the state legislature

        •  Oh yeah. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          PapaChach

          That's why Cuomo is floating all those other funding ideas for the UPK program, right?

          He'd be much happier to give DeBlasio the money by pulling it from some other area of the state budget, where it might be doing good for some other program or community, than he would be to allow the city a tax hike. He's got presidential aspirations, and this is New York. Can't afford to upset the bankers. Or the real-estate magnates. Or David Koch.

          "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself."........ "The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little." (yeah, same guy.)

          by sidnora on Tue Jan 21, 2014 at 03:06:42 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Which means only that De Blasio is already (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            sidnora

            wrong about promising that his "good friendship" with the governor with smooth the way for passing this tax. I believe he said it in the interview with Alec Baldwin.

            •  That may be true. (0+ / 0-)

              My take is that Cuomo doesn't have much use for "good friendship" if it runs counter to his ends, and he's pretty ruthless. On DeBlasio's side, he talks a good game (and is still talking one), but is a lot more pliable than Cuomo. Not in a good way.

              Cuomo starts out with the upper hand here, simply because DeB can't enact a tax without state approval. When I first learned this, I thought WTF? but I guess it's a holdover from the city's fiscal crisis back in the 70's.

              My guess: we'll get UPK, possibly even statewide, because Cuomo knows a winner when he sees one, and is always happy to take credit. But it won't be funded the way DeB wants, and Cuomo will frame that as a good thing.

              "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself."........ "The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little." (yeah, same guy.)

              by sidnora on Wed Jan 22, 2014 at 04:48:41 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

          •  So long as it doesn't come at the expense (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            sidnora

            of a football stadium for SU.

            •  Heh. nt (0+ / 0-)

              "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself."........ "The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little." (yeah, same guy.)

              by sidnora on Wed Jan 22, 2014 at 04:49:08 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

      •  yeah, right because they come from different (0+ / 0-)

        backgrounds precludes a friendship. Maybe you need to tell them that. Such stupidity.

        Bill de Blasio, New York’s next mayor, will assume office Jan. 1 holding a potential political asset that few, if any, of his predecessors have enjoyed: a close friendship with the governor.

        De Blasio’s relationship with Governor Andrew Cuomo, which goes back more than 20 years, will make them effective partners, both men say. Others, including their former colleague Cardell Cooper, wonder how well the camaraderie can survive the often conflicting political interests and responsibilities of running the third-biggest U.S. state and the nation’s largest city.

        “There’s a lot of decisions that have to be made and hopefully they won’t lose sight of the respect they’ve gained for each other,” said Cooper, who worked with both when Cuomo headed the U.S. Housing and Urban Development Department and de Blasio was his regional director for New York and New Jersey. “Disagreement is fine; it’s about how they come to a result, where they go in the battle.”

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