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View Diary: Books That Changed My Life—Which Book Do You Regret Not Buying? (71 comments)

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  •  Cannot comment on a book I didn't buy (13+ / 0-)

    but I CAN comment on a book I never should have lent:

    The 3 Pillars of Zen by Philip Kapleau Roshi

    "For over thirty years Roshi Kapleau's Three Pillars of Zen has been the wellspring of Zen teachings for practitioners in the West, remaining as vital and fresh today as it was when it was originally published.  It truly ranks among the timeless classics of Zen Buddhism."--Roshi John Daido Loori, Abbot, Zen Mountain Monastery

    "For anyone seriously interested in Zen--this book will be invaluable."--Times Literary Supplement (London)
    .

    Lent it out....never returned.

    I need to buy it again.

    Legal means "good".
    [41984 | Feb 4, 2005]

    by xxdr zombiexx on Fri Feb 07, 2014 at 06:04:52 AM PST

    •  I have fantasized about ordering a (13+ / 0-)

      bookplate that says something like

      "From the permanent library of Phoebe Loosinhouse. In the event this book is entrusted to another and not returned to the collection from whence it came, misfortune will follow its purloin until dutifully restored to its rightful place."

      Too much?

      “Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough.” FDR

      by Phoebe Loosinhouse on Fri Feb 07, 2014 at 06:30:53 AM PST

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      •  No, Phoebe, I think it's perfect (5+ / 0-)

        People shouldn't borrow books and fail to return them.

        My father taught me that books are to be cherished: never underlined, never highlighted, and the pages were to be turned very carefully, by inserting the tip of the forefinger under the page number top right and reverently turning the page over.

        Of course, with study guides I ignored the "no highlighting" rule, but for the others I followed his teachings.

        "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

        by Diana in NoVa on Fri Feb 07, 2014 at 07:07:23 AM PST

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      •  a thousand times no!!!! (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        RiveroftheWest

        there's a good number of books on my shelves that are replacements for ones i've lent that never made the trip home…

        Deserves it! I daresay he does. Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement. For even the very wise cannot see all ends. - Gandalf the Grey

        by No Exit on Fri Feb 07, 2014 at 02:40:24 PM PST

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    •  Yes, xxdr, sometimes that's the only way (6+ / 0-)

      (Huge sigh.) I've lent books that I never got back. You know what? Not going to do it ever again.

      The Three Pillars of Zen sounds like a really worthwhile book. Hope you can find it for a good price.

      Thanks for stopping by and commenting, it's good to see you!

      "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

      by Diana in NoVa on Fri Feb 07, 2014 at 07:04:35 AM PST

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    •  I don't believe in lending (8+ / 0-)

      books. I give them away. Sometimes the person I'm giving them to promises to return them but I don't share their fanciful expectations ;)

      "George RR Martin is not your bitch" ~~ Neil Gaiman

      by tardis10 on Fri Feb 07, 2014 at 07:24:58 AM PST

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      •  I love the whole concept of the traveling (9+ / 0-)

        book - the one you register on a web site and leave in a bus station or something and the the person who picks it up is supposed to leave it in a public place for another reader when they are done and then you can track all the places the book has been left on the website. Can't remeber the name of the site offhand.

        If I were wealthy I'd love to buy a million copies of Shock Doctrine and leave them all about.

        “Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough.” FDR

        by Phoebe Loosinhouse on Fri Feb 07, 2014 at 07:31:23 AM PST

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      •  You are a realist, tardis10! (4+ / 0-)

        (Grin.) I'm pretty much the same way, now.

        "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

        by Diana in NoVa on Fri Feb 07, 2014 at 07:45:01 AM PST

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        •  Rather like drinking Scotch... (4+ / 0-)

          this is a realism one acquires. Which brings me full circle,since Alasdair Gray's Lanark was the book that really,truly,ain't no going back to the innocence, umm, taught me this life lesson.
          Ehh,I probably needed that,especially then.

          "George RR Martin is not your bitch" ~~ Neil Gaiman

          by tardis10 on Fri Feb 07, 2014 at 07:53:52 AM PST

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          •  Lanark...sounds Scottish (3+ / 0-)

            Have you time to tell us about it, tardis10?

            "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

            by Diana in NoVa on Fri Feb 07, 2014 at 07:56:38 AM PST

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            •  Weeel,if I wrote it was (5+ / 0-)

              epic,divided,dystopic,brave,transportive,allegorical,flawed and overwrought and deliberately measured would that help? Thought not. But at least my struggles to describe it are shared...

              The Joyce comparison is valid on many levels, and I think provides an insight into Gray's approach and methodology as a novelist. However, a passing mention of Ulysses provoked me in 1981 into a further comment on Gray's novel (and a defence of myself as reviewer). A couple of weeks after my review appeared, the TLS published a hostile letter from a reader in New Lanark - coincidentally - one Rose Arnold, who took me angrily to task for identifying the city of "Provan", in the Unthank books, with Edinburgh. She saw Lanark as being entirely about Glasgow and declared that "to deny the interest of the Glaswegian theme is rather like suggesting Ulysses might as well have been set in London". I defended my review robustly two weeks later on the letters page, citing Gray himself as the authority for a possible Provan/Edinburgh identification, but, as a Parthian shot, I also pointed out that "to read Lanark throughout as a 'loving analysis' of Glasgow is seriously to limit and confine the effects and resonances of the novel: rather like reading Ulysses solely for what it can tell you about Dublin". What I was saying to Rose Arnold was that Gray had made sure - and had taken enormous pains in so doing - that we could not read his novel as a Bildungsroman, or thinly disguised memoir, or science fiction, or a Bunyanesque allegory, or a loving analysis of Glasgow. He managed to make Lanark all of these things and more, and that is why it has been read and will continue to be read: reading Lanark will leave its trace on your life. William Boyd on Lanark in 2007
              http://www.theguardian.com/...

              "George RR Martin is not your bitch" ~~ Neil Gaiman

              by tardis10 on Fri Feb 07, 2014 at 08:11:01 AM PST

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