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View Diary: I was just diagnosed with breast cancer (146 comments)

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  •  Me too (14+ / 0-)

    I was going to write about my two mastectomies and cancer experience for support but I have been stricken to see how many of us have had breast cancer!  

    Why?  I am 75 yrs old and never remember anyone, while growing up, getting cancer, let alone breast cancer.  What is causing it?

    My cancer forms in estrogen.  Who would have known?  I thought it traveled via lymph nodes but not always.  Taking meds to remove the estrogen from the body...hopefully, it will give me some more years.

    Good luck with your treatments, it will be your choice.  As you visit the various doctors, they will give you what stage cancer you are in along with your choices.  Use the internet to get more information while you make your choices.  Stay away from kooks.

    •  Please do come write for the Monday Night Cancer (6+ / 0-)

      Club here at Kos.

      Tracy B Ann - technically that is my signature. If I had Bill Gates money, I'd buy Detroit.

      by ZenTrainer on Sun Feb 09, 2014 at 01:52:00 PM PST

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    •  People did have it years ago (4+ / 0-)

      but they kept quiet. (My aunt died of breast cancer in 1969.)

      I've also read that the reason we know so many people is that we know survivors -- and there are a lot more of us surviving it than there were in the 1960s.

      I also have a theory that those of us who came of age during the era of above-ground atomic bomb tests may be at higher risk -- and that the hormone-disrupter plastics may also have increased the incidence. But none of those are easy to prove.

      And of course mammograms are diagnosing "cancer" (including "Stage 0") that ups the count, and years ago wouldn't even have been noticed much less treated as cancer.

      •  when I was growing up (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Maudlin

        it was way before 1969!  I remember people getting polio, had many friends and relatives who had the disease before the Salk vaccine.  I had and aunt and uncle with TB...no one I knew, family or friends, had cancer.  I am 75 yr old.  If anyone had cancer, others (friends and/or relatives) would have known.  It was the 1960s when I started hearing about cancer and it was fairly rare.  Now look at how many on this list has/had it.  Plus, besides myself, I have one relative with it and lots of acquaintances fighting it.  My late ex-husband and two of his sisters died of it twenty years ago.  I remember hearing that it was a genetic thing, however, I am the first in my family with it.

        •  look it up (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          hopeful

          SEER database maintains statistics on cancer. Breast cancer rates took a big jump up in the 40s, but were about the same in the 50s, 60s.
          They've come down in the last decade.

        •  there was a huge (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Maudlin

          stigma about cancer for previous generations. It's entirely possible that relatives/friends had it and you wouldn't know.

          Also people tended to die before they were old enough to get cancer-of TB (my grandfather died of it at 43) or polio or other infectious diseases.

          Inconceivable! You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

          by hopeful on Mon Feb 10, 2014 at 05:24:41 AM PST

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    •  People had it. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Maudlin

      but I don't think it was as common as it is now, and it's true, people didn't talk about it as much. I have a cousin who is still alive, over 100 years old, who had a radical bilateral mastectomy sometime in the 1960's.

      "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself."........ "The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little." (yeah, same guy.)

      by sidnora on Sun Feb 09, 2014 at 04:12:22 PM PST

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      •  as you live longer.... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        sidnora, Maudlin

        you see things.  Also, mammograms catch a lot of tumors that might be fairly slow growing for many years.

        You shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you mad. Aldous Huxley

        by murrayewv on Sun Feb 09, 2014 at 04:34:07 PM PST

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        •  True that. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Maudlin

          30 years ago, no one would have found my stage 0 tumor for years, even with a mammogram. Back then, my mom's tumor was discovered by her doctor during a manual exam. She'd had a mammogram 2 weeks before.

          "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself."........ "The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little." (yeah, same guy.)

          by sidnora on Sun Feb 09, 2014 at 04:43:28 PM PST

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      •  the rates of br. cancer have dropped (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        sidnora, Maudlin

        but because of the rise in baby boomer population, the absolute numbers are higher.

        •  That's interesting, (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Maudlin

          And certainly counterintuitive. If true, it would of course be wonderful news. Dropped since when? I'd love a link if there is one.

          In my grandparents' generation (and there were a lot of great-aunts), there was not one case that I am aware of. In my mom's generation, many, including my mom and her kid sister. In my generation, early boomers, it seems common as dirt, including me.

          And the other trend I see (anecdotally, of course) is much more occurrence among younger, pre-menopausal women. In the late 70s, I knew a woman whose sister had been diagnosed at age 39, and it was unheard of. 15 years later the same thing happened to my best friend. And during my treatment, it was shocking to me how many young women I ran into in various waiting rooms.

          Every year, when I ran the Race for the Cure (which I no longer do, for well-publicized political reasons), I wore two of those ”In Memory of" and "In Celebration Of” bibs, by the end I had a couple dozen names on those bibs, just out of my own family and close friends.

          "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself."........ "The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little." (yeah, same guy.)

          by sidnora on Mon Feb 10, 2014 at 04:41:13 AM PST

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          •  sorry, didn't recheck comments til now (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            sidnora

            I'm sorry there's so much cancer in your family. Its a very ugly disease.
            Have you looked at your grandfather or father's side of the family as well? gene mutations can come from either side.
            from cancer dot gov

            more info

            •  Oh, I didn't even mention (0+ / 0-)

              most of it. There's a lot of non- breast cancer in my mom's family too. I was genetically screened and I'm negative, as I expected - although I fit the profile ethnically, the typical genetically-linked cancer strikes much younger women than me.

              BTW, the other two cancers that seem far more common to me these days (anecdotally, of course) are prostate and thyroid.

              Thanks for the link!

              "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself."........ "The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little." (yeah, same guy.)

              by sidnora on Tue Feb 11, 2014 at 05:33:28 AM PST

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