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View Diary: Threats to "Religious Liberty" That Aren't ... Are They? (43 comments)

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  •  Paying for religion (0+ / 0-)

    To me it has more to do with what I (as a taxpayer) has to pay for.  I shouldn't have to pay taxes to build or run someone's church ( we do that, but that's another story)?  I shouldn't have to pay for a cross to be built in the public square.  You get the idea.

    A person with very strong religious beliefs against contraception should not be compelled, through their tax dollars, to pay for someone's contraception (although they may still have to pay for a military to kill people, even if their religion forbids that).   So, as the argument goes, as a business owner I should not be compelled to provide (pay for) an insurance plan that covers contraception for my employees if that plan violates my religious beliefs.

    There is a problem with this reasoning, however.  NO employer pays for an insurance plan for his or her employees.  To pay for an insurance plan, an employer must first hold revenues back from wages and other compensation to provide it to an employee.  Make no mistake about it - if you have an insurance plan through your employer, you pay for it.  All of it, regardless of how much your employer pays of the premium.  The employer pays his portion with money he didn't pay you in salary or wages.

    Because of this fact, an employer should have NOTHING to say about the morality of what the insurance plan covers.  It is the employee who pays for  the coverage.  

    •  I think it's also important to point out... (0+ / 0-)
      NO employer pays for an insurance plan for his or her employees.  To pay for an insurance plan, an employer must first hold revenues back from wages and other compensation to provide it to an employee.  Make no mistake about it - if you have an insurance plan through your employer, you pay for it.  All of it, regardless of how much your employer pays of the premium.  The employer pays his portion with money he didn't pay you in salary or wages.
      ...that a "religious" employer could simply choose to look at it this way, and thereby absolve himself in his own mind of any violation of or affrontery to his own religious beliefs. I'm against contraception, but I'm not using it, not providing it and not paying for it; I am simply providing compensation to my employees for their labor, which my religion does not prohibit.

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