Skip to main content

View Diary: Maui's Dirty Little Secret (94 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  MECO is refusing interconnection permits (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    88kathy, LinSea, ypochris, mimi

    And saying that Maui circuits are at max for new PV.

    That's why we're trying to pass SB2656 to stop MECO/HECO from blocking rooftop solar.

    •  I know a couple of years ago a home owner I (0+ / 0-)

      talked to here was having trouble hooking into the grid. I guess if you put back more than you take out, the power company pays you.

      There are many hurdles on solar power too. Firefighters have to be aware of fighting a fire on a home with solar panels for instance.

      I wonder how it will work out in a few years.

      Now they have the 2nd (safety net for sloppy) Amendment, and can't be infringed to actually treat their gun like a gun and not a video game controller.

      by 88kathy on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 11:29:52 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Two ways of accounting on PV (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        88kathy, ypochris

        Net Metering (the best)
        You get credit for all the energy you generate but the utility doesn't pay you for it.  When your load is higher than your generation, they give you back from the energy you banked without charge except a low monthly interconnection fee (about $18/mo on Maui)

        Buy/Sell
        The utility buys low (wholesale price) and sells back to you high (retail price)  Usually this does not work well for the homeowner unless they over-size their system which will have a bigger initial capital outlay and not as good ROI.

        Fires is something I've never heard of with PV...unless it was a backup battery that caught fire.

        •  OIC (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          88kathy

          You mean that they need to pull the switch both on the main circuit and the solar circuit so as not to run into live wires?

        •  No I mean just a regular house fire. The (0+ / 0-)

          firefighters have to consider the electricity in the PV????

          I am not sure.

          Does the PV explode in a fire? What is the PV is real hot and you put cold water on it, what happens?

          Now they have the 2nd (safety net for sloppy) Amendment, and can't be infringed to actually treat their gun like a gun and not a video game controller.

          by 88kathy on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 04:02:22 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  if - what if not what is. (0+ / 0-)

            Now they have the 2nd (safety net for sloppy) Amendment, and can't be infringed to actually treat their gun like a gun and not a video game controller.

            by 88kathy on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 04:04:17 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  The low voltage DC electricity (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            88kathy

            from a PV panel should pose no hazard. I test connectivity on mine by touching one bare wire to my tongue while holding the other. For a single panel - wouldn't do that with the whole array! Some run their arrays at higher voltages but I don't think it is a real issue.

            Water on a hot panel could shatter the glass, but the same is true of a window.

            Batteries in a stand-alone system could be an issue, but generally I don't think firefighters have to consider any special precautions when faced with a house using solar energy. Your house is full of wiring and all sorts of toxic when burned substances anyway.

            •  Such new stuff. The info has not had a chance (0+ / 0-)

              to filter down to me. Thanks.

              Now they have the 2nd (safety net for sloppy) Amendment, and can't be infringed to actually treat their gun like a gun and not a video game controller.

              by 88kathy on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 05:50:10 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

            •  True - on the rooftop panels (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              ypochris

              the voltage is low.  But on a battery backed up system the house wires can still be energized to 110 volts by the inverter.

              I think that PV panels would pose far less risk of shattering from heat differential than a hotwater solar collector or a window.  So I'm not seeing how a PV system would pose any additional risk in a fire.

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site