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View Diary: Something Useful: 25,000,000 People Could Use a FBI-NSA Secured Linux to Replace Microsoft XP (43 comments)

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  •  Actually my laptop is dual-boot (3+ / 0-)

    Between Ubuntu 13.10 and Windows 7 (in spanish).

    None are so hopelessly enslaved, as those who falsely believe they are free. The truth has been kept from the depth of their minds by masters who rule them with lies. -Johann von Goethe

    by gjohnsit on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 11:44:38 AM PDT

    •  Any comparison of security performance? (0+ / 0-)

      Ease of using IP protections? Apps ?

      And as a guess, figuring these things out is for experts. I'm a consumer for the answers like most people. I wouldn't know where to look even to start testing them.

      Before Snowden, we paid a couple bucks for antivirus and enhancements but really didn't think about security issues.

      Now, getting 25,000,000 people out of FBI-NSA info attacks makes sense.

      •  I run Win8 on a dual-boot desktop (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        waterstreet2013, JeffW

        that we use as a home entertainment center. Not my choice, but family wanted a system that didn't require guest orientation.

        There's a much richer, better marketed universe of applications for the Windows environment. Hardware installs w/ Windows tend to be seamless, as they've already paid somebody to write the script.

        The software that we call Linux ( the GNU OS running on top of the the Linux kernel) is inherently more secure than Windows. Unix/BSD were designed from the ground up as multi-user systems- they didn't assume that just because you were at the keyboard you should have full control of the system. Windows started from the assumption that it would always be a single user OS. Unix/BSD was networked from byte 1, unlike Windows. Security has always been a real concern- for Windows it's an afterthought.

        Basically, Windows is a hobbyist OS, and Linux/Unix/BSD is military spec. I mean that in a very literal sense.

        But if you want a truly secure computer, never connect it to a network. That sort of takes the fun out of computer use, but anything after that is compromise.

      •  Apps are the thing (2+ / 0-)

        Windows has a lot more apps than any other OS.

        However, if all you do is use gmail, facebook, DKos, and maybe some simple word documents, then Linux would be the way to go.
           Installing Ubuntu or any other linux flavor is as simple as installing Windows.

         The advantage of dual boot is if something happens to one OS you are still alive (this happened to me recently) and can do something about it without reinstalling the OS.

         Linux is much more secure than Windows if you take just a couple simple steps during/after installing.

        None are so hopelessly enslaved, as those who falsely believe they are free. The truth has been kept from the depth of their minds by masters who rule them with lies. -Johann von Goethe

        by gjohnsit on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 01:06:30 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I'm old- I just can't shorten it to "apps". (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          gjohnsit, waterstreet2013
          The advantage of dual boot is if something happens to one OS you are still alive (this happened to me recently) and can do something about it without reinstalling the OS.
          You can also stick a bootable OS onto a USB drive, if you don't want to dedicate the (meager) drive space that the second OS takes up.

          I use a bootable USB if I ever have to work on anybody else's computers- Set up so the internal drives aren't really used, so all of my data comes with me when I leave.

    •  same here (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      waterstreet2013, ebohlman

      All my pcs for years have been dual boot. I have to say that Ubuntu's UI has gotten less useful recently and I'm looking around for another flavor. Maybe debian.

      "Tell the truth and run." -- Yugoslav proverb

      by quill on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:52:52 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  If you don't like Unity (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        petral

        You can install Gnome, Gnome Classic, LXDE or XFCE. Once you do that, your login screen will give you a choice of which desktop environment you want to use. LXDE and XFCE are particularly good choices for people who prefer an "XPish" look and for people running on slow/limited-memory machines.

        BTW, most Linux distros wil run any of those desktop environments.

        Unfortunately when smart and educated people get crazy ideas they can come up with plausibly truthy arguments. -- Andrew F Cockburn

        by ebohlman on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 04:26:24 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  yes, though features vary (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          petral

          I've been using xfce, particularly on my android phone and tablet, which full Ubuntu doesn't support due to some issue with unity vs the ARM processors (gnome works fine). But these lightweight desktops lack features, and seem to suffer from developer neglect. I'd like to think that the mobile version of Ubuntu will solve all problems and usher a new age of cross platform open OS goodness, but I'm skeptical ...

          "Tell the truth and run." -- Yugoslav proverb

          by quill on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 05:54:44 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

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