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View Diary: Guess which students get suspended the most in our post-racial society (121 comments)

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  •  Gosh, maybe if those young folks... (5+ / 0-)

    behaved more like Paul Ryan, our country would be super-duper.

    And our plates would be extra clean, too.

    So, what do the Paul Ryans of the world do when confronted with facts such as this? I mean, besides make things up, of course.

    This is always the part that the Ayn Rand acolytes conveniently fail to grasp: Yes, equality is awesome, but only if everyone comes from an equally advantaged background, which clearly isn't -- and perhaps never will be -- the case.

    Hell, if I'm reading this correctly, if you're a gay African-American or Latino student with a disability, you're pretty much destined to get suspended.

    The arc of the moral universe is longer than we guessed.

    How about I believe in the unlucky ones?

    by BenderRodriguez on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 09:52:12 AM PDT

    •  It's the breakdown of the family I tell you!! (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Deep Texan

      Whatever that means.

      America, where a rising tide lifts all boats! Unless you don't have a boat...uh...then it lifts all who can swim! Er, uh...um...and if you can't swim? SHAME ON YOU!

      by Back In Blue on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 11:41:10 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  doesn't it mean the changing culture (3+ / 0-)

        of families. my grandfather lived with the entire family on a small piece of land. as the family grew, more houses were built. they took care of each other, literally. they worked together. they ate together. they danced together.

        eventually the area became a city and the family members eventually moved into their own respective houses around the city.

        instead of multiple generations and cousins living under one roof, it's now just the nuclear family unit. for a time the wife stayed home and the husband earned the money. then the women went to work and were liberated. that set off the war of the sexes. which is still going on btw. women still don't make the same as men. women are constantly pigeonholed into a mold created by men/society.

        so from their point of view the breakdown was the wife deciding she had rights, could earn her own money and stopped doing everything for her man. this equal partnership is the right direction but a loss of power/prestige of men everywhere. it's similar to race issues. race, women and gay issues are all civil rights issues. equal protection, rights and access are all these groups require. men (mostly white) can't stand it. have been thorns in the side of progress for as long as i can remember. the things white men in my home town say about women, gays, latinos, blacks etc. are vile.

        -You want to change the system, run for office.

        by Deep Texan on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 12:01:58 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I meant whatever as in "whatever it means today" (4+ / 0-)

          Your description is perfect and far better and clearer than anything I've ever heard out of goper's mouth. They tend to add on all their personal agenda items to check the dots for each of the groups they pander to and to help muddy the waters and avoid accountability.

          As for white men?  Of course they don't like it because all their privileges are being taken away.  I know, I am a white man.  But I grew up with a strong mother who, although she stopped working as a surgical nurse when her kids were born, had an equal voice in all things in our family. My wife and I do the same and having two daughters has also enlightened me on many issues I thought I understood.  

          That said, there are a lot of white men like me, especially in the next generation.  It's only a matter of time!

          America, where a rising tide lifts all boats! Unless you don't have a boat...uh...then it lifts all who can swim! Er, uh...um...and if you can't swim? SHAME ON YOU!

          by Back In Blue on Thu Mar 13, 2014 at 03:23:13 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  If you had parents, you would most likely (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        auapplemac, slothlax

        have a boat to be lifted in.

        Parents or the lack there of is the number one influence for a person's success in life.

        Certainly there are teachers that are not always fair or skilled in handling their students.  It is well known that female teachers will favor male students and male teachers that will favor female students.  That kind of bias, even in the most innocent ways is built into human nature.

        To me, the saddest thing is that this web site plays the race card, when in fact the biggest single problem with our primary and secondary educational  system isn't the schools or the teachers, it is the parents that aren't doing their job!  It is the parents job to raise their children, to see that they apply their selves in school, teach them to how to get along with other students and to respect the school staff.  Parents are far and away the biggest influence on how our children develop, but only is they, the parents, are fully ingaged in raising the children.  Children learn so much just by  "osmosis," by watching their parents.  I saw that in my children and I can see it in my grand children.  When parents are absent, the chances that the children will be "feral" goes way up.

        •  I do not know if I even agree or disagree with (5+ / 0-)

          your comment.  Because as soon as you decided to say...Play the Race Card...I bristled.  I do not like when people use that phrase, bothers me a great deal.

          Keystone Liberals on Twitter @ KeystoneLibs , Join PA Liberals at http://keystoneliberalsforum.aimoo.com/

          by wishingwell on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 05:03:24 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  "this web site plays the race card"? (9+ / 0-)

          Oy.
          I have kids too, and I have grandkids too. Some are white, some are kids of color. Raised all their lives by the same parents, but if you think society doesn't see them and treat them differently, you're kidding yourself.

        •  Growing up with no or improper discipline is the (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          manyamile, sajiocity, slothlax

          cause of much of these problems.

          I have written before that parents are the primary teachers of their kids for the first important years of their lives.

          If kids are not taught to behave or be respectful, they enter school at a disadvantage.

          Please don't think I'm supporting bringing up little martinets just kids who know how to behave in a group, how to respect the other kids in the classroom.

          You're not supposed to throw things, curse, interrupt the teacher or another student when they are talking. Wait your turn and most important not to solve problems by fighting.

          When kids are raising kids or older grandmothers are raising their grandkids, it difficult for children to be kept on the right track.

          It’s the Supreme Court, stupid! Followed by: It's always the Supreme Court! Progressives will win only when we convince a majority that they, too, are Progressive.

          by auapplemac on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 05:10:37 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  My daughter taught public school (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            sajiocity, middleagedhousewife, Miira

            in Baltimore, in the neighborhood where they filmed The Wire. Some of her kids were being raised by their grandmothers, some by very young moms.
            None of them behaved the way you describe. Respect goes both ways, and in a student-teacher relationship, it starts with the adult.

            •  No, it starts with the child being brought up to (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              slothlax

              know how to behave in a classroom. That primarily comes from home.

              Funny how so many on dKos support the Teacher's Unions, but when it comes to the teachers, not so much.

              I was raised in a lower middle class/lower income neighborhood. I went to an integrated K-8 school. We all knew how to behave. We were taught by our parents to listen to the teacher. She continued to guide us on how to behave in class to show respect for both her and the rest of the class.

              This continue through middle school. It was an "open" school. While in a middle class neighborhood, the kids came from all types of backgrounds and neighborhoods. Still no major discipline problems in the classroom.

              This was in the late 40s/50s. What has changed since then?

              It’s the Supreme Court, stupid! Followed by: It's always the Supreme Court! Progressives will win only when we convince a majority that they, too, are Progressive.

              by auapplemac on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 07:32:08 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  I think you're starting with the presumption (4+ / 0-)

                that kids who are raised by single moms or grandmothers are not being taught to show respect. That's quite a presumption- and in most cases it's simply not true.

                In my daughter's class, she made conflict resolution a part of every day's activity, especially at the beginning of the year. If there were any kids who had problems with it initially, they all learned to do it faster than you would imagine.

                She considered it part of her job to help kids have a peaceful learning environment. So did the teachers I had in school- also in the fifties. They didn't call it conflict resolution, but they worked on classroom dynamics in their own way.

                I don't agree that it should now be the sole province of parents to do what teachers have done for decades. If anything has changed, it's that expectation.

        •  Oh and by the way, rockman13- (5+ / 0-)

          you've been here nine years and your first comment ever is about "the race card" and "feral" children.
          Fascinating.

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