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View Diary: Turning Texas Blue By 2016? San Antonio Mayor, Julian Castro, Could Help (17 comments)

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  •  Two Questions (0+ / 0-)

    1: What is the percentage of voting age Latinos in Tejas?

    2: What is the estimated turnout rate for Latinos in Tejas

    a long habit of not thinking a thing WRONG, gives it a superficial appearance of being RIGHT, and raises at first a formidable outcry in defense of custom.

    by Jamesleo on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 08:44:21 AM PDT

    •  Texas as a whole has very low voter turnout (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      camlbacker

      One of the lowest in the country.  And hispanic/latino turnout lags even this.  GOTV could use a lot of help in TX.

      •  Thank you (0+ / 0-)

        Do you have and sources or citation. I undersand La RAZA is getting involved in increasing voter turnout?

        a long habit of not thinking a thing WRONG, gives it a superficial appearance of being RIGHT, and raises at first a formidable outcry in defense of custom.

        by Jamesleo on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 10:37:24 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Population is 38% Hispanic, about 27% of people (0+ / 0-)

      who are eligible to vote in Texas are Latino. 39% of eligible voting age Latinos voted in 2012. 55% of eligible Latinos are registered to vote. Source.

      "There must be something beyond slaughter and barbarism to support the existence of mankind and we must all help search for it."

      by camlbacker on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 12:26:10 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  So Texas is Red because of who is not voting (0+ / 0-)

        a long habit of not thinking a thing WRONG, gives it a superficial appearance of being RIGHT, and raises at first a formidable outcry in defense of custom.

        by Jamesleo on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 06:28:07 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Much of the red parts of the U.S. are red (0+ / 0-)

          because turnout among blue voters is lower than it is among red voters.  And it's most true of Texas, which has the lowest voter turnout in the U.S., as I understand it. Scratch that, for 2012, Texas was 48th out of 51 (including D.C.) with 50.1% of eligible voters casting a ballot.

          The report zeroes in on two overarching factors that boost voter participation: An Election Day registration option and swing state status. The latter point is pretty self-evident -- the states up for grabs where candidates spend their time and money are likely to attract stronger turnout. And as to Election Day registration, it's a reflection that voters are really utilizing the option, where available. Of the nine jurisdictions where Election Day registration was an option last year, seven placed in the top 20 in overall turnout, including Minnesota.
          Source.

          "There must be something beyond slaughter and barbarism to support the existence of mankind and we must all help search for it."

          by camlbacker on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 08:40:07 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

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