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View Diary: Nate Silver's Science Guy, Sure Isn't Bill Nye. Denialist Pielke At It Again. (84 comments)

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  •  Maybe if you read the diary with an open (6+ / 0-)

    mind. Reboot and try reading it again.

    I'm in the energy industry and I found the diary a fun read. As Donald Rumsfeld was infamously said, "you go to war with the army you have, not the army you want."

    Currently our army is: coal, natural gas, fuel cell, solar, wind, hydro, nuclear. Not in this army is Carbon Capture.

    •  Agreed. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      pollwatcher

      Trying to develop something isn't the same as planning a campaign around it. Jet airplanes might have been on someone's drawing board in WWII, but the Allies never made plans to deploy them on the battlefield.

      One recurrent thought in the global warming/peak oil school is that we might have run out of time to make industry-wide adjustments. McKibben for one says frequently that our time to act was in the late 70's, when it became clear that oil discovery had peaked and that we faced a future of finite energy resources.  This with the budding science of climate study and a then-dim sense that we might be having an effect on things was the moment for us to change course and begin planning, at the highest levels of government and industry, for a planet of finite resources which is sensitive to our outputs. Then Reagan struck a deal with the Iranians, got elected, and we got eight years of sunny optimism and promises of limitless growth.

      We now face the reckoning for those promises. A lower-energy future is almost certainly the prospect for our global society, whether that's voluntary or involuntary. At this point, even with our entire army plus prospective help from those elements not yet in it, it's looking like that will be involuntary.

        •  Interesting! (0+ / 0-)

          I knew they'd been developed, and the Germans used a few (saw a documentary where an American prop-fighter pilot described seeing one of those in action, and he and the other American pilots asked each other, "What the hell was that?"). But I didn't know about those UK fighters. Though it's hard to argue that they were a significant part of the combat force, so I think the analogy to carbon sequestration is still apt. The technology was in its infancy, so to speak.

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