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View Diary: Animal Nuz #196 (120 comments)

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  •  Well, I know something about "The Rancher": (51+ / 0-)

    "The Rancher" tends to get lazy grazing his cattle on public land. Now,  "The Rancher", in the good old days stole his land from Native Americans, fair and square, learned a good work ethic and even enhanced his income by bringing Native American scalps to the Federal Government for a dollar apiece. Today though, "The Rancher" sucks at the teat of the Federal Government and grazes his cattle on your land and mine and refuses to pay his taxes.

    Talk about a "welfare queen"!

    Pope Francis: the Thumb of Christ in the eyes of the Pharisees.

    by commonmass on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 08:07:28 AM PDT

    •  And for 3 yrs running the Rancher due to the (19+ / 0-)

      severe drought pumped water so fast out of the aquifers that their wells/ponds went dry.  So they tried to sell off their herds but found no buyers (everybody was having the same problem).  Now with herds dying from lack of food (couldn't grow grass or make hay) they shot them in the fields.  

      Now the price of meat his climbing up as the demand didn't go away, it increased due to those who could get their cattle to market to flood it into cheap prices during the drought.  Now there is a shortage of herds coming to market.  There is a virus going around the hog farms that kill the pigglets when they are a few days old (crowded conditions).  So there is a pork shortage...

      Looks like a good time to go vegan... no wait, the price of produce is skyrocketing - the drought in SoCal.  Maybe we can divert the grain fed to cattle/hogs back to the people.

      We can make it, we just need to be judicious about what we are doing.

      DBA

      "Death is the winner in any war." - Nightwish/Imaginareum/Song of myself.

      by doingbusinessas on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 08:24:04 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Sounds like an ideal time... (11+ / 0-)

        ... to grow a little patch of garden of one's own, preserve the produce in the fall (canning, freezing if one has a large freezer).

        My grandparents, bless 'em, used to grow a "little vegetable garden," and gram had flowers around the edges because they were pretty.  With no kids to feed any longer, small was a relative size.

        Every fall, regular as clockwork, they were calling around saying they'd canned all they could, had no way to preserve more (had run out of jars - they didn't have a freezer like my parents did), their shelves were full, and they still had more in their garden.  Could we (and others they called) come and get some of the veggies before they over-ripened and were wasted...?

        They never charged for the food - then or now - people just had to come and get it themselves; however, the idea that food might go to waste horrified them to nightmares.  They'd gone through the Great Depression so knew what shortages were, altho, as my uncle said, they never starved because everyone had a garden and all of them canned, and even people in town had veggie gardens, as well (veggies, meat after fall butchering, etc.), and the dust bowl conditions didn't reach this far north so food was plentiful.  However, money was in short supply so farm hands worked like a week at a time for a quarter plus room and board.

        In due time my folks did the same with a "small" garden.  My bro & sil do the same now (they have both shelves for canning that my dad built ages ago, and replaced the large freezer our parents used to have with one that must be the same size or larger in the basement - they're living on the farm now).

        I'm pretty sure no one in that community knows how to raise a genuinely "small" veggie garden because it seems people are always calling and begging someone to come pick the food they can't use because they have canned or frozen all they could and don't have room for more preserved food.  There never used to be food shelves for the poor many years ago, but perhaps there are now and I hope someone takes the leftover food to them.

        Yup, with farms dotting the landscape, they can get manure any time they want for fertilizer if they don't have cattle of their own.  I understand the old "aged" manure is better so some put it over their gardens in the fall and cultivate it under int he spring when they prepare their gardens for planting.  [I don't know.  I'm an apartment dweller in a town - and allergic to almost everything outdoors - so I don't raise a garden.  What I know of gardening is from being a kid weeding the folks' garden, helping Mom with some canning when I got older, and bits of conversation from adults over dinner or coffee.]

        Still, while there are people around who know how to raise a garden, who know how to harvest seeds [no GMO foods for them!], it would be best if young people can learn about these things from the senior citizens who learned from their parents and grandparents how and when to plant what, which ones to start early as seedlings indoors, and how to use natural fertilizers.  As things stand right now, I'm convinced many city-dwellers haven't thought beyond getting their canned foods in stores and would starve to death if store-bought canned foods disappeared because they have no idea how to grow their own food, how to raise livestock for meat (and some meats are now inedible since they're being fed odd things and antibiotics and medicines in feeder lots; I've not eaten beef since 1992, quit eating turkey and chicken because they taste odd now, and pork is iffy - sometimes it tastes like I remember it, sometimes not).

        If people don't learn how to raise their own foods, they just might starve.

        I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

        by NonnyO on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 11:16:42 AM PDT

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        •  gardening (4+ / 0-)
          Still, while there are people around who know how to raise a garden, who know how to harvest seeds [no GMO foods for them!], it would be best if young people can learn about these things from the senior citizens who learned from their parents and grandparents how and when to plant what, which ones to start early as seedlings indoors, and how to use natural fertilizers.
          And if they have no such resources?

          I would strongly recommend the several Farmers' Almanacs one can lay hands onto out there. Combined with some basic research on the species one wants to grow, you can obtain this knowledge in this way even if you are an nth-generation city dweller.

          Just another reason why the "high density" living model needs to be completely abandoned ASAP......

          "It's high time (and then some) that we put an end to the exceptionalistic nonsense floating around in our culture and face the fact that either the economy works for all, or it doesn't work AT all." -- Sean McCullough (DailyKos user thanatokephaloides)

          by thanatokephaloides on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 12:34:56 PM PDT

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          •  Yes, Farmer's Almanacs, too... (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            ericlewis0, thanatokephaloides

            ... IF some of those young people know how to read.

            I was going on disbelief that kids couldn't understand cursive any longer so they were not going to teach it..., until my granddaughter (who turns 18 next month) said she couldn't understand my writing...!

            Insert jaw drop - my handwriting is at least legible, and not my brother's chicken scratches or the old Gothic penmanship in English and three other languages I can read, transcribe, and often translate (if I can't, I know who can).

            I taught myself cursive in first grade by copying the examples above the chalkboard when the teacher was busy with the other three grades in the room; I was the only child in my grade from second through sixth grade when I was bussed to another school.  My printing is atrocious, but my cursive is quite good (except for my college notebooks, done when I was 41-45).  I even have calligraphy pens and have used them.

            In any case, for those who know how to read and are good with reading comprehension, I recommend books, books, and more books and/or lots of online reading to learn how to grow their own foods and gather non-GMO plants and seeds and get them to grow in their own back yards - or even mix them in with flower beds if their home-owner associations don't permit food gardens (a notion I find totally ridiculous).

            Obviously, I agree with you.  :-)

            I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

            by NonnyO on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 02:49:11 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  The hardest part of the GRE (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              ericlewis0, NonnyO

              I recently took at age 35 was the paragraph-long handwriting sample...

              I hadn't written cursive other than my signature or a check amount for about 25 years (since leaving elementary school).  I've no trouble reading it though.

              Iron sharpens Iron. Normal is a dryer setting. STOP illegal immigration NOW! -- Make it LEGAL. If Corporations are People--Let's draft them.

              by benamery21 on Sun Apr 27, 2014 at 04:26:39 AM PDT

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        •  Do you remember the Foxfire books? (8+ / 0-)

          Back when I was in high school in the mid 70's, my HS had an outdoor "land lab" and a greenhouse.  Those books were the backbone of a lot of what was taught in our classes that utilized both the land lab and greenhouse.  Last year I found the first four books buried in some boxes in my basement.  They are now in our everyday reference book group.

          When will our consciences grow so tender that we will act to prevent human misery rather than avenge it? Eleanor Roosevelt

          by seefleur on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 12:43:48 PM PDT

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          •  Must be after my young prime... (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            ericlewis0, Aunt Pat, miscanthus

            Never had Foxfire books when I was young.

            I started grade school in 1952.  We had Dick and Jane readers....

            From grade school I remember only a few things: the Revolutionary War was started because of 'taxation without representation' (a factoid that was important to remember 60 years later when I obtained copies of one ancestor's Rev. War records) America was named for Amerigo Vespucci, learning to read and sound out words via the phonetic method of reading (my junior and senior high classmates had been part of a reading experiment for sight reading so as a senior we had to take a special spelling class; I aced it), and when the Pledge of Allegiance was changed in 1954, I found it difficult to remember inserting 'under god' in the Pledge each morning.

            I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

            by NonnyO on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 02:56:10 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Thats OK ... (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              ericlewis0, NonnyO

              I still have trouble remembering to  insert 'under god' in the Pledge myself and it has been 50 years.

              JON

              "Upward, not Northward" - Flatland, by EA Abbott

              by linkage on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 05:52:11 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  I don't at all (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                ericlewis0, Bluefin

                If I'm in a place where the pledge is said, I say all the rest - except - the two words inserted in 1954.

                I'm with Jefferson & Madison.  There MUST be a total separation of religion and state at ALL times.  Period.

                Anyway, aside from a few ancestors who came here to get away from state-imposed religions, I read all those ancient histories of what happened to lead up to things like that, and the death and destruction and torture can only be avoided if religion is NOT part of government (that's why the 'office of faith-based initiatives needs to be defunded and abolished).

                The Founding Fathers must be spinning in their graves.

                I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

                by NonnyO on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 09:04:44 PM PDT

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        •  I have the following: (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ericlewis0, NonnyO, Aunt Pat

          3 4X4X6" raised beds on the front "patio" (2 owners ago concreted over the front yard).

          1 2X4X1 V shaped patio box

          2 3X6X8" beds in the back yard (one has hops growing in it) the other has self seeding Swiss chard in it).

          The V bed has two tomatoes and a bush cucumber.  One of the 4X4 has strawberries, another is parsley and lettuces (mostly corn flower greens) and the last has 2 types of yellow squash and a lemon cucumber.

          Oh and I had a leaking koi pond on the patio and I turned it into a herb garden (rosemary, oregano, lavender, Valerian, sages (3 kinds), thyme, lemon balm, false curry and basil.

          "Death is the winner in any war." - Nightwish/Imaginareum/Song of myself.

          by doingbusinessas on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 12:56:39 PM PDT

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          •  You are a busy person in your gardens! (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            ericlewis0, Aunt Pat, doingbusinessas

            Mmmmmmmmmm..... Strawberries........  We had those in our garden when I was a kid.  Love 'em!  I also like squash.

            [I'm deathly allergic to sage as a pollen or sage as a food.  It does awful things to my body.  Tomatoes aren't much better, altho I used to love fresh sliced tomatoes with sugar when I was a kid.  I'm not much for lots of spices.]

            I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

            by NonnyO on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 03:00:40 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  But It's OK When White Republicans Do It (12+ / 0-)

      Because they are "thrifty" not cheap, "self-reliand" not mooching off the government. Put them out of business and you destroy the mad-cow disease distribution system it has taken generations to create, along with lots of jobs that white republicans are too busy creating other jobs to actually lower themselves to perform.

    •  The Rancher also doesn't want (14+ / 0-)

      to pay the taxpayer subsidized 10 times lower grazing fee for public land.  

      Would he prefer to pay 10 times more for public grazing or just try to mooch off his neighbors, too?

      Republicans hate food stamps (unless it's for herds).

      There already is class warfare in America. Unfortunately, the rich are winning.

      by Puddytat on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 10:49:06 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I thought market rates were over 20x... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Bluefin, ericlewis0

        ...the taxpayer-subsidized rates?
        One article I read (forget where, so no link; apologies) said private-land market rates for grazing rights were north of $30 / head per month.*
        Clivestock's been charged (and not-paying) something like $ 1.35.
        If I were getting a 95% discount on something -- and especially if it's at the expense of my fellow citizens -- I'd be both extremely grateful, and most careful not to do anything to jeopardize such a sweet deal.
        But that's just me -- and I'm no Publican or other conservatard.
        They clearly have different ways of thinking about such things.

        *caveat:  I imagine rates vary wildly by terrain, locale, amount / quality / accessibility of forage, season, weather, market conditions, and so forth.  The article did not specify the figure as local to Clivestock's compound.

        •  Yes he has been charged at $1.35 per grazing unit. (0+ / 0-)

          Yet he says that the federal government does not exist and cannot own land, in which case the State of Nevada actually owns the land in question. If that is the case, he owes $16 plus change for each grazing unit all the way back for those many years!! Yes, Private grazing has been around thirty dollars a unit, he was getting an amazing deal, but could not even accept that amount which is JUST PLAIN STUPID!!!

    •  He's ...... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ericlewis0, Bluefin

      a Foodstamp Farmer and a very SNAPPY dresser......

      it tastes like burning...

      by eastvan on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 01:14:19 PM PDT

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      •  Especially that copy of the US Constitution (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        eastvan, ericlewis0

        sticking out of his shirt pocket. The one with the image of George Washington on the cover that his ilk love to wave around without having any concept of its' meaning.
        Yeah, the same Washington who swiftly crushed an uprising of scruffy westerner tax and fee non-payers in the Whiskey Rebellion.

        "The church of life is not in a building, it is the open sky, the surrounding ocean, the beautiful soil"...George Helm, 1/1977

        by Bluefin on Sun Apr 27, 2014 at 11:39:35 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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