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View Diary: GFHC: After All, They Were Only Part of the Inventory (26 comments)

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  •  Looking for a volunteer to host 5/9 GFHC (5+ / 0-)

    open thread

    Current schedule

    May 9 -   open for adoption
    May 16 - Zwenkau
    May 23 - klompendanser
    May 30 - open for adoption
    Jun 6 -   open for adoption
    Jun 13 - open for adoption

    Anyone interested in taking an open date?

    •  Congrats! (6+ / 0-)

      I may try to do one in June, I'm getting ready to go out of town and May is pretty busy.

      I had planned to do an earlier diary on one of my difficult to research ancestors, but he fought in the Seminole Wars and I felt it might be inappropriate given our many DKos members who are NA.

      I found some interesting stuff on one of my Plymouth Colony ancestors who was arrested for "selling wine to Indians". His son's records note that he had a bastard child as well.  Oy, those Puritans and their record keeping. Imagine that as the only fact future generations can glean about your life.

      Glad you found those records about your husband's ancestors. It's great there are so many deed and probate records online now.  It used to require a genealogy vacay to some county's archives to get that kind of information.

      I've also seen slave census records in some states (Missouri). I've tried to trace a few of the slaves that lived in my ancestors area. Though my ancestors didn't own them and opposed slavery, my gr gr grandfather tried to reach out and employ them after the Civil War.  My grandmother remembered some of them working at the farm during harvests. She said my gr gr grandfather always insisted they take meals with everyone in the work crew & family.  I suppose out of past habit, the former slaves would take their meals separately, out under a tree.  Grandad said no way, you eat with the rest of us, we're all the same.  Some of the property owners in the area have erected memorials at local slave cemeteries, I'd like to do the same, if I can find them.  My grandfather told me approx. where one is located, but it will take quite a bit of hiking up a very steep hill and will probably be difficult to locate.  I may try on my next trip home.

      Money is property, not speech. Overturn Citizens United.

      by Betty Pinson on Fri May 02, 2014 at 10:09:14 AM PDT

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      •  Old slave cemeteries. (6+ / 0-)

        I have looked for where old Henry may have been buried.  He died between 1887 and 1900, and there were no vital records then to tell me where he might be buried.  But even if I found the cemetery, I doubt I'd find his gravesite, as very few African-Americans at the time could afford an engraved headstone.  If anything, he may have had a wooden marker, sure to have disintegrated long ago.

        I don't give up easily though!

        But any more intense search I do for Henry or any of my husband's ancestors will have to wait until after I retire (hopefully next year!).

        Kudos to your grandparents.  They were ahead of their time.

        •  Sometimes they used stones to mark graves (4+ / 0-)

          I've had the same problem with my anglo ancestors. They were often poor and could only erect wooden markers or large stones.  

          Link to a slave cemetery project in MO

          One possibility is to check with local funeral homes.  Many of them maintain records of local cemeteries.  If an old mortuary goes out of business or is bought out, the other owners will take their books.  It helps them to  know available spaces in the old country and family cemeteries. I heard this in a genealogy class and finally checked it out in my parents hometown.  Sure enough, the local funeral home director pulled out the old books and helped me find a bunch of old grave locations.  IIRC, he even knew where some of the slave cemeteries were located.  

          Money is property, not speech. Overturn Citizens United.

          by Betty Pinson on Fri May 02, 2014 at 10:33:28 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  For what it's worth (5+ / 0-)
        I had planned to do an earlier diary on one of my difficult to research ancestors, but he fought in the Seminole Wars and I felt it might be inappropriate given our many DKos members who are NA.
        I don't think it would be inappropriate at all. It could offer a great opportunity to shed light on what happened then and for reflection on how your values differ from this ancestor's.

        “Republicans...think American standard of living is a fine thing--so long as it doesn't spread to all the people... And they admire of Government of the United States so much that they would like to buy it.” Harry S. Truman

        by fenway49 on Fri May 02, 2014 at 11:25:01 AM PDT

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        •  I'm not sure why he did it (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          edwardssl, fenway49, klompendanser

          He probably enlisted in the military because of poverty. His father died when he was very young and his mother didn't remarry. They were German immigrants who didn't speak English very well. It could be that it was just the military action that happened when he was enlisted.

          He raised children who were good people. His son was the one mentioned in my other post who reached out to local former slaves to give them work.  Hard to figure this stuff out sometimes. I believe he was also very connected to the Lutheran Church, as he always moved and lived with other members of the Missouri Synod.

          Money is property, not speech. Overturn Citizens United.

          by Betty Pinson on Fri May 02, 2014 at 11:41:21 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  That's often the case (3+ / 0-)

            On the one hand, people had different ideas then about clearing folks off of land they wanted. On the other hand, a lot of people enlisted because they needed the pay and free food. I think it would be an interesting story and you could highlight all the economic causes that would lead someone to sign up. That's an issue that, in a way, is still with us.

            “Republicans...think American standard of living is a fine thing--so long as it doesn't spread to all the people... And they admire of Government of the United States so much that they would like to buy it.” Harry S. Truman

            by fenway49 on Fri May 02, 2014 at 12:28:56 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Another possibility (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              edwardssl, klompendanser

              Family lore (from people who didn't know he was in the Seminole Wars) said there was some kind of horrible tragedy in the family where they were attacked by Indians and most of the family killed.  I haven't been able to document it yet, but I ran into a distant, distant cousin genealogist researching him who told the same story.

              Money is property, not speech. Overturn Citizens United.

              by Betty Pinson on Fri May 02, 2014 at 12:54:46 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

    •  I could take May 9 if you need it (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      edwardssl, klompendanser

      People might be getting sick of me though!

      I might do something that's not a story, something a little easier and different. One of these days I'll have to revisit weird boys' names and my pop sociology as concerns Vermont in the 1890s vs. life today, etc.

      “Republicans...think American standard of living is a fine thing--so long as it doesn't spread to all the people... And they admire of Government of the United States so much that they would like to buy it.” Harry S. Truman

      by fenway49 on Fri May 02, 2014 at 01:24:15 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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