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View Diary: This Threat to Net Neutrality Makes FCC Fast Lanes Look Like Child's Play (130 comments)

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  •  We should have at least 4 credible competitors (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    freakofsociety, Bluefin

    in major markets for wireless and for high speed wired internet.  Regulation needs to change to increase competition.

    FCC should be making more spectrum available by reallocation and also permit multiuser sharing of spectrum.

    Local wired service is regulated by over 30,000 local government entities, some of which charge extraordinary fees and some have licensed monopoly rights.  Local fees for routing fiber should be little above the cost this imposes on government or other local utilities.  Allow/Encourage fiber on street with high performance WiFi being an option into people's homes.  In major markets where there are less than two credible high speed broadband providers to consumers, local government should be encouraged to put in last mile fiber to homes that ISPs could then service.

    Note that the profitability of AT&T is good but not exceptionally high for a capital intensive business - profit on revenue is 14% (11% for Comcast), return on assets less than 7% (less than 6% at Comcast).  This means that having government in some way forcing them to lower prices would not decrease prices very much.

    The most important way to protect the environment is not to have more than one child.

    by nextstep on Fri May 02, 2014 at 10:35:05 AM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  In major markets... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Bluefin

      ...you generally do that have much competition already.  On wired, you'll have VHDSL or fiber-to-the-door, cable, urban ethernet for offices and apartments, and fixed microwave (wireless, but is latency/cost/throughput equivalent to wired).

      On wireless, you'll have all big four wireless providers and their resellers.

      High performance WiFi's still a myth for the most part.  MIMO's getting better at separating signal from noise, and we're in one of those "5 years down the road" situations waiting for a commercially viable product, but the closest we have right now is mesh networks on unregulated spectrum, and that has n! scaling issues.  There's a lot of research devoted to fixing that, but it's going to be a while, and regulation's not an issue there.

      What I can point to, balance-sheet wise, is AT&T suddenly announcing GigaPower, their 1Gbps Google Fiber alternative, with a much wider rollout than Google Fiber...and amazingly, they're able to do this without increase capital expenditures.

      From AT&T themselves:

      "This expanded fiber build is not expected to impact AT&T’s capital investment plans for 2014."
      You're falling for "fiber-to-the-press-release".

      Everyday Magic

      Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
      -- Clarke's Third Law

      by The Technomancer on Fri May 02, 2014 at 11:25:58 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Are you serious? (0+ / 0-)
        In major markets... ...you generally do that have much competition already.  On wired, you'll have VHDSL or fiber-to-the-door, cable, urban ethernet for offices and apartments, and fixed microwave (wireless, but is latency/cost/throughput equivalent to wired).
        Uh... huh. How many major markets have you been to?

        I personally am familiar with three high-density cities in the US. Not a single one of them has DSL over 6 mbps available in more than 1/3 to 1/4 of the city. Not a single one of them has a significant presence of fiber-to-door. None of them has urban ethernet for anything smaller than hundred-unit complexes, and the majority of housing everywhere is in smaller blocks than that. And fixed wireless? Come on. How many people are able to install things on their roofs in a city, even if they do have LOS to anywhere? The landlord can, but none of them ever do unless they are in a demand-constrained market.

        I live in San Francisco, less than a half mile from one of the highest-tech areas. My choices for internet access are comcast (which, even if I could stand the company, is notoriously unreliable where I am) or 4 megabit DSL. (Or a bonded pair of two 4 megabit DSL lines, if I want to pay over $100 a month.) Or a cellular modem. That's it. Those are my options.

        Or possibly what you mean by 'major markets' is something different than I would mean?

        •  SF, Dallas, Los Angeles, San Antonio, Austin (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          JVolvo

          And sitting in SF right now, right off of South Park.  On a fixed wireless connection through Monkey Brains.  Sucks that those are your options, dude.

          And check with Monkey Brains.  Sometimes they can make it work without rooftop access, using the space that your building has to allow for you to use satellite TV if you wanted to, per the FCC.

          Everyday Magic

          Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
          -- Clarke's Third Law

          by The Technomancer on Fri May 02, 2014 at 01:48:04 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

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