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View Diary: Do you speak Russian, Vietnamese, Arabic, Tagalog? In some states, these rank third most common (102 comments)

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  •  As the quoted paragraph from Blatt notes... (12+ / 0-)

    ..."survey includes a detailed look at the languages spoken in American homes."

    Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

    by Meteor Blades on Tue May 13, 2014 at 06:33:48 PM PDT

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    •  I lived there for 20 years , (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      tharu1

      in day to day life , Japanese was and I am sure still is the most common . If you want to just talk about permanent residents , I'll still say Japanese because of all the people who learn it to talk with the tourists .

      In some states, these rank third most common

      One thing he discovered was that Spanish is the second most common language spoken in all but seven of the 50 U.S. states.

      Most Commonly spoken language other than English or Spanish

      "please love deeply...openly and genuinely." A. M. H.

      by indycam on Tue May 13, 2014 at 06:47:49 PM PDT

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      •  But the language you speak to tourists... (10+ / 0-)

        ...is not the language you speak at home. Tunisians speak a lot of German to tourists. I can assure you they do not speak it at home.

        Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

        by Meteor Blades on Tue May 13, 2014 at 06:57:49 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  I agree, should be Japanese or Chinese (0+ / 0-)

        But just because people learn a language to speak to tourists doesn't mean they use it at home.

        I live in a Chinese household and I'm fluent in Japanese, English and some German and Spanish (please don't test me).

        My wife is a certified Japanese translator and also fluent in Korean and some English.

        We mainly speak Chinese at home, our native tongue. Other vocabulary gets mixed in, and my daughter is now studying English, but I'm pretty unlikely to break out the German over dinner.

        All that said, immigration patterns change from time to time so when you get to a second or third most common language, that is subject to change.

        No one is coming to save us, the future is in our hands.

        by koNko on Tue May 13, 2014 at 10:51:11 PM PDT

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        •  A lot of Filipino foreign workers speak Tagalog (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          koNko

          and are a large portion of the workforce in Hawaii and for that matter California.

          In Massachusetts, which I know a little better, the communities of Portuguese speakers are not the same for  the Portuguese spoken in Portugal and the Portuguese spoken in Brazil and both communities together while large would have to be considered but one of a hundred different communities of foreign language speakers located in Boston and its suburbs to include communities of native American speakers.

          Iron workers speak Mohawk regardless of where they work. I suppose you could say the same thing for Portugese fishermen whether they are fishing out of New Bedford or Rhode Island. Speakers of MicMac, Abekanaki and Passamaquoddy languages are no longer as numerous throughout the New England States as they once were but I'm pretty sure they still outnumber speakers of Navaho and Hopi languages.

          You could also look at communities of Cape Verde Islanders, Orthodox Greeks, Chinese and Vietnamese, as well as the Italians, Scots Irish, various African and Hispanic language speakers.

          As I recall many Massachusetts community health centers have employees who each in addition to their medical expertise train to speak several of as many as 26 different languages that are required to service just a single community

          "la vida no vale nada un lugar solita" "The Limits of Control Jim Jarmusch

          by rktect on Wed May 14, 2014 at 02:06:26 AM PDT

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        •  Purely out of curiosity, may I ask (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          koNko, Eric Nelson, TrueBlueMajority

          which Chinese you speak?

          •  Mostly Putonghua Mandarian & Shanghainese (3+ / 0-)

            Which are different dialects with different roots. And some Cantonese (poorly).

            In most of Mainland China people entering school from the mid-70's onward or university grads speak Putonhua as a 1st or 2nd language except in some more remote rural regions where it was not until the past 10 years or so that Putonghua was standardized in the curriculum.

            And for my daughter, we stress Putonghua 1st, English 2nd and Shaghainese and Anhui dialect Mandarian as conversational. If you ask her a question in Shanghainese she will usually answer in Putonghua except for some local idiomatic expressions. Think global, swear local.

            No one is coming to save us, the future is in our hands.

            by koNko on Wed May 14, 2014 at 08:55:58 AM PDT

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            •  Thanks. My understanding is that (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              koNko, TrueBlueMajority

              Shanghainese and Wu dialects generally are very different from Putonghua, with a very low level of mutual intelligibility.  Certainly the Wikipedia description, which seems to have been done by someone fairly knowledgeable, shows a very different phonology.

              •  Yes. Different roots. (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                BMScott, TrueBlueMajority

                Of course, live languages are a melting pot but if you were to hear them spoken back to back, it would be obvious.

                Of course, some heavily-accented Mandarin dialects like Beijing "Dong-Bei" would probably sound unique to an unaccustomed ear just as English spoken with various regional accents and dialects.

                I have seen the Wikipedia article on Chinese and it is very good.

                No one is coming to save us, the future is in our hands.

                by koNko on Wed May 14, 2014 at 11:36:13 AM PDT

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