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View Diary: Bill McKibben issues a call to action (78 comments)

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  •  I disagree. (19+ / 0-)

    Scale makes a difference. If you - and only you - walk instead of takinga bus, the impact is minimal.  Now scale it up - what if we're talking one or two people, for 25% of the busses in a city? What abouta state? ...a nation?  ...worldwide?  

    Same/similar regarding protests. Scale it up - 10 people? 100? 10,000?

    More?

    People notice.  Media ( eventually ) notices.  Businesses notice.  And impact perceptions.

    And perceptions matter.

    •  a good example is MLK and the Bus boycott in (8+ / 0-)

      Montgomery Alabama. Yes a few people here and there meant nothing but many many people made all the difference.
      http://mlk-kpp01.stanford.edu/...

      Sparked by the arrest of Rosa Parks on 1 December 1955, the Montgomery bus boycott was a 13-month mass protest that ended with the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that segregation on public buses is unconstitutional. The Montgomery Improvement Association (MIA) coordinated the boycott, and its president, Martin Luther King, Jr., became a prominent civil rights leader as international attention focused on Montgomery. The bus boycott demonstrated the potential for nonviolent mass protest to successfully challenge racial segregation and served as an example for other southern campaigns that followed. In Stride Toward Freedom, King’s 1958 memoir of the boycott, he declared the real meaning of the Montgomery bus boycott to be the power of a growing self-respect to animate the struggle for civil rights.
      (emphasis mine)

      without the ants the rainforest dies

      by aliasalias on Wed May 21, 2014 at 12:10:41 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  And ordinary Americans (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        aliasalias

        I suspect, could actually use a good dose of self respect.

        In Stride Toward Freedom, King’s 1958 memoir of the boycott, he declared the real meaning of the Montgomery bus boycott to be the power of a growing self-respect to animate the struggle for civil rights.
        We have been taught for over 30 years now that we are nothing as individuals unless we are "successful" (filthy rich) and that if we are not "successful" we have no right to do anything in this country but what we are told to do by our employers, our bought-and-paid-for politicians, and the increasingly militarized police.

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