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View Diary: Shlach L'cha: Speaking Truth to Power (6 comments)

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  •  First, mazel tov to your daughter (4+ / 0-)

    This is a wonderful drosh - many thanks. I'm putting together this year's interfaith service at Netroots Nation, on how we keep ourselves from despair so we can keep fighting for tikkun olam. May I use some bits from this, or do you have other thoughts I could use about where that courage comes from?

    We need a world in which we ask "What's happened to you?" more and "What's wrong with you?" less. (From a comment by Kossack nerafinator)

    by ramara on Fri Jun 13, 2014 at 12:40:33 PM PDT

    •  Whew, that's a hard one! (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ramara, Navy Vet Terp

      All I can speak to is personal experience. Although I try very hard to do the right thing, often I'm hampered by my own fear (of seeming rude, wrong, abrasive, clueless etc). Enough episodes of standing by why something horrible happens, and eventually your fear of what may come is greater than your fear of speaking out. Moses had seen all the plagues (don't you think he once had friends among the Egyptian first-born) and had no doubt about the seriousness of the threat facing them.

      After seeing all that horror, wouldn't you overcome your fear and say enough is enough?

      When it comes to activism though, I live by the rule that you have to ask a minimum of six times if you don't get what you want the first time you try asking. Moses never got to see the promised land but he got us all one step closer. Sometimes it takes a generation or more to effect the change we need today, and it seems like we'll never reach where we're going.

      But we get there—someday—because we believe in a sacred charge of repairing the world. When we're willing to reach out to strangers and turn them into friends, what a monumental first step that can be.

      •  Thank you. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        BoogieMama

        These are good thoughts, and will help.

        We need a world in which we ask "What's happened to you?" more and "What's wrong with you?" less. (From a comment by Kossack nerafinator)

        by ramara on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 11:15:08 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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