Skip to main content

View Diary: McDaniel says 'we're going to be fighting this' ... but how? (154 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  I'm not sure how it works in Mississippi, (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ER Doc, suzq, dewtx

    but if someone chose a Dem ballot in the original primary, wouldn't there be a record of that?  Not their actual vote, but which ballot?  If that person then voted in the Republican run-off as well, I think that's illegal.  Hopefully the Dems who voted for Cochran are ones who didn't show up for the original primary but I guess that's part of what the McDaniels team is investigating.

    •  That's how it works in every state I've ever lived (6+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ER Doc, patbahn, Bailey2001, Lujane, ColoTim, dewtx

      in.

      What the Right Wing calls "being politically correct" is what my mama used to teach me was "being polite".

      by Walt starr on Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 11:30:42 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  They have open primaries, so there should be no (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bleeding blue, kfunk937

      party affiliation.

      Also, how can it be illegal for Republicans to vote in the run off, but not Democrats, if it's an open primary?

      One could also argue that he or she did vote on June 4th, but did not vote in the Senate race.

      "And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow-rover, And quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick’s over." - John Masefield

      by mungley on Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 11:37:19 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  There is a specific law (17+ / 0-)

        The run-offs are a follow-up to an individual primary.  Just because YOUR party didnt require a run-off does not give you permission to vote twice.

        If you voted in the Dem Primary, that was your primary vote.

        If you voted in the GOP primary, this run-off is a continuation of that contest and you are entitled to participate.

        If you didn't vote in a primary, this run-off is a part of the open-primary season and you are entitled to your vote.

        Красота спасет мир --F. Dostoevsky

        by Wisper on Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 11:41:29 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Ok. Thanks. With an open primary that makes no (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          a2nite, dewtx

          sense.

          "And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow-rover, And quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick’s over." - John Masefield

          by mungley on Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 11:52:25 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Why not? (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Lujane, dewtx, Nespolo

            You have one-vote and you get to cast in either open primary you want, regardless of registration.

            If both parties went to run-offs, you'd vote once on primary day (in either party) and then once more on run-off day to further decide your selected primary.

            If you didn't vote on primary day, you are free to join in on any run-off, regardless of registration.

            But you don't get to vote in one party primary and then vote again in the other party's run-off.

            Красота спасет мир --F. Dostoevsky

            by Wisper on Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 11:59:02 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Because it doesn't record your vote (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              mungley

              In an open primary, you can vote for anybody.
              It isn't truly a democratic or republican primary
              So, how do you determine which republicans crossed over and voted in the democratic primary and thus should be disallowed, vrs democratic voters who voted for a republican in the first election and therefor should be allowed to vote again?
              States with open primaries should bite the bullet like my crazy state and ignore party affiliations, or require a party based ballot that is recorded, and thus bar splitting your ticket.

              •  You show up with registration ID. (6+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                AnnieR, mmacdDE, Lujane, suzq, dewtx, kfunk937

                You ask for which party ballot you want (and you are free to pick anyone you want) and you vote.

                They record your name and which ballot you used.

                They don't get to know who you voted for.  Just that you voted and which ballot you used.

                Closed primaries are the same.  Your participation, with proper affiliation, is recorded but your selection is your own.

                I live in DC, I have to give my name and get checked off a list when I vote.  Same thing....

                Красота спасет мир --F. Dostoevsky

                by Wisper on Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 12:13:26 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

              •  It's open (7+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                AnnieR, mmacdDE, Lujane, ColoTim, dewtx, Nespolo, mungley

                in the sense you can choose your ballot at the poll.  It is not open in the sense that all of the candidates are on one ballot, and the top two make it to the general election (I think there are at least some districts in CA that do that -- that's how a Republican got elected in a strongly Democratic district).

                When you arrive at the poll, in other words, you declare which ballot you want to vote, and can vote secretly for any candidate on that ballot.  But the ballot you chose is recorded; if you chose the Democratic ballot in the primary, you can not then go back to the poll and choose the Republican ballot in a runoff.

                The other part of it -- the claim that you cannot vote in a primary unless you intend to support the candidate -- doesn't make any sense, though.

              •  It doesn't record who you vote for (7+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Lujane, suzq, ColoTim, Ahianne, dewtx, Nespolo, mungley

                but it will record what primary you voted in.

                So if you vote in the Dem primary, it will be noted. If you vote in the GOP primary, it will be noted.

                And if you didn't vote in EITHER, you can vote in the run-off of either, if there is one.

                It could have worked the other way if the Dem primary had gone to a run off. Any GOP voter who hadn't voted in the GOP primary would be able to vote in the Dem run off.

                It's not closed, so it doesn't matter how you're registered, just what primary you voted in.

                But I'll bet dollars to doughnuts that changes pretty damn fast.

            •  but you could vote in Dem primary and Repub (0+ / 0-)

              run off, if there were two run-offs.

              And clearly Democrats were allowed to vote this week.
              If it was 'open' primary and 'closed' run-off that would make sense, but obviously that is not how it was handled by the state.

              I walk into a precinct. I am given a ballot and I vote for one candidate in each race listed on the ballot.

              "And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow-rover, And quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick’s over." - John Masefield

              by mungley on Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 12:11:43 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  you have to ask which ballot you want. (5+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                mungley, Lujane, ColoTim, dewtx, Nespolo

                You get to vote in either one, regardless of your registration.

                You a Dem and want to vote in GOP Primary.. you are free to do so.  But you can't say "I want to vote in the Dem Primary"... elect Childers (and other down ballot candidates presumably) and then decide "I also want to vote again in the other party's second round".

                I dunno... doesnt seem strange to me.  I thought it was a good thing that non-voters are allowed to enter in at the run-off point and not be excluded outright since they didn't vote in the first round.

                Красота спасет мир --F. Dostoevsky

                by Wisper on Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 12:16:50 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Oh. That makes more sense. (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Lujane, dewtx

                  I guess we had something like that a decade or so ago here.

                  I was thinking of CA where we are top 2 vote getters for now.

                  "And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow-rover, And quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick’s over." - John Masefield

                  by mungley on Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 12:28:48 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

      •  it is... (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mungley, sknutson415, Lujane

        illegal to vote in both the original Dem and GOP primary, but is it explicitly illegal to vote in both the original DEM primary and the GOP RUNOFF primary?

        Is not the runoff a "new" election?

        "It's almost as if we're watching Mitt Romney on Safari in his own country." -- Jonathan Capeheart

        by JackND on Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 11:49:55 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  But once you vote, your name is taken off the roll (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mungley

        for the next election.

        You can't vote in two primaries, whether those primaries are held on the same day or not.

        That's the way it worked in VA when they had open primaries.

        •  SoO it should have been a closed primary. (0+ / 0-)

          If it was, and only people who selected Republican ballots or didn't vote the first time voted in the run off, then there is nothing for McDaniel to complain about.

          "And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow-rover, And quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick’s over." - John Masefield

          by mungley on Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 09:45:04 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  I AM a Mississippi resident (8+ / 0-)

      And a registered Democrat, but I voted in the primary and in the runoff for Cochran.  Defeating McDaniel was more important than casting a vote for Travis Childers, who was a lock to get the Democratic nod.  

      The way it works, after signing in you request a Democratic or Republican ballot.  If anyone made a note of which ballot I took, I didn't see it.  I didn't sign anything but my name on the voter roll.

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site