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View Diary: SB 1070: Why I'm not going to Arizona (552 comments)

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  •  While My Initial Reaction Was Solidly on Your Side (12+ / 0-)

    and before I saw most responses, http://www.dailykos.com/... , I have since learned that the early boycotts by various Latino organizations have largely been called off.

    I guess, coming from a world of Irish traditional music where there are some open political sores still festering, I can understand a personal reaction. It's just a little less obvious on an institutional basis when there is less community behind the individual reaction.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Sun Jul 20, 2014 at 12:17:13 PM PDT

    •  I'm not sure that is persuasive (16+ / 0-)

      without some explanation of why it was called off.

      I explained why I won't go.

      I need more than an appeal to authority to change my mind.

      Not that anyone really ant to change my mind anyway.

      •  Yeah I've Still Got More to Learn About This Isue. (12+ / 0-)

        No question that I understand the personal reaction.

        We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

        by Gooserock on Sun Jul 20, 2014 at 12:26:11 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Why it was called off (6+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        oortdust, Urizen, mayim, manyamile, CenPhx, Cedwyn

        9-9-2011:

        The National Council of La Raza said it was canceling its boycott because it successfully discouraged other states from enacting similar laws, and the boycott imposed a hardship on the workers, businesses and organizations it aimed to help....

        The Washington-based group said that effective immediately it and two other La Raza-associated groups would ask other organizations to suspend their Arizona boycotts.

        La Raza also said the boycott spurred political results in Arizona, namely an increase in Latino voters and defeat in the Legislature of more proposed immigration laws, including a measure that would have changed how U.S.-born children of illegal immigrants are granted citizenship.

        •  And voters recalled the State Senator who pushed (6+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Adam B, oortdust, Urizen, mayim, manyamile, a2nite

          SB1070 through, a guy named Pearce. Then he ran in the next election in another district and lost again. Hasn't been heard from since.

          SB1070 was passed in the height of the Tea Bagger BS in 2010. Jan Brewer, who makes Dubya look like Mensa, had succeeded Janet Napolitano as Gov. She wasn't in a particularly strong political poistion, and made a political decision to sign it. She won by a dozen points. Now that she's term limited she's looking at that legacy thing, and fought tooth & nail to pass ACA Expanded Medicaid, and vetoed that ALEC sponsored legislation to allow "we don't serve fags here' business owners because of their "sincere religious beliefs".

          David Koch, a teacher and a Tea Partier sit down a table with a plate of a dozen cookies. Koch quickly stuffs 11 cookies in his pockets, leans to the bagger and says "watch out, the union thug will try to steal your cookie".

          by Dave in AZ on Sun Jul 20, 2014 at 03:03:03 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  In other words, it was called off... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          grover

          ...because nobody thought it was needed anymore in that situation and that the losses might outweigh the future gains, which were perceived to be diminishing.

          Not because it didn't work in the first place -- it quite obviously did.

          Visit http://theuptake.org/ for Minnesota news as it happens.

          by Phoenix Woman on Sun Jul 20, 2014 at 07:23:55 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  For what it's worth, Armando... (5+ / 0-)

        I agree with your decision 100%...and here is where I am coming from:

        I live in Indiana...long with history of mistreating minorities of varying origins (We're diverse that way). My best friend was Mexican-American. His parents barely spoke or understood English, but worked their asses off to support their family of EIGHT, learn the language of their surroundings (and by God, they did), and understand American culture (Good luck with that, I told them!).

        Nearly every month they would be stopped and asked for their papers. They were harassed and insulted routinely. My best friend was called every racial slur in the book. I swear, I fought more fistfights defending my best friend and his family's honor than I fought in a home with a physically-abusive father who used me as a punching bag.

        Honestly, if I was Latino and was faced with the prospect of facing this sort of harassment, legal disgrace and disrespect, I wouldn't come within 100 miles of that state's border. I wouldn't spend a fucking penny in furtherance of that state's economic prosperity not because I would want to harm the good and decent people there, but because MONEY TALKS when it comes to politicians. Damages to their economy are what they understand, not general decency.

        If AZ lawmakers want to get their act together and welcome Latinos back, they can repeal that fucking law. Until then, know that many of us have your back on this.

        Adequate health care should be a LEGAL RIGHT in the U.S without begging or bankruptcy. Until it is, we should not dare call our society civilized.

        by Love Me Slender on Sun Jul 20, 2014 at 06:03:44 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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