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View Diary: Black Kos, Week In Review (110 comments)

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  •  you know the answer to that question (11+ / 0-)

    Sis - sadly.

    We haven't even dealt with mortality of children

    The UN Children's agency says the highest death rates are in Africa and Asia and nearly half of all children who die are in five countries: Nigeria, Congo, India, Pakistan and China. In West and Central Africa, there has been virtually no change in the number of children who die every year since 1990.

    The UN says the top killers are pneumonia, diarrhea and malaria.

    .....
    Currently some 18 000 children under five die every day. Half of those deaths take place in five countries: China, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, India, Nigeria, and Pakistan.

    The immediate causes are mostly pneumonia, prematurity, birth asphyxia, diarrhea and malaria, according to the report.

    Ebola is now making headlines because it "might" spread to the West.

    "If you're in a coalition and you're comfortable, you know it's not a broad enough coalition." Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon

    by Denise Oliver Velez on Fri Aug 08, 2014 at 01:55:11 PM PDT

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    •  True That, But (3+ / 0-)

      In this case, arguably enlightened self-interest (since no matter how non-airborne Ebola is on its own, the long lead time before folks become symptomatic allows it to potentially travel with man-made wings all over the world ) would suggest a different approach than the usual "we couldn't care less what happens to Those People" approach that is at the bottom of why child mortality in poor non-white countries remains so high.)

      At this point, I just want America to admit that it still doesn't want its Black citizens to live in any state other than terror, subservience and inferiority, under pain of death. I can handle American racism, but I can't handle American denial.

      by shanikka on Fri Aug 08, 2014 at 02:44:45 PM PDT

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      •  true. My problem is we have (6+ / 0-)

        known about the lack of proper isolation facilities in many African hospitals and have done almost nothing.

        First outbreak 1976:

        Occurred in Yambuku and surrounding area. Disease was spread by close personal contact and by use of contaminated needles and syringes in hospitals/clinics. This outbreak was the first recognition of the disease.
        Many hospitals did not have (some still don't) disposable syringes -  I ran into this tracking infection vectors for HIV.  

        Hospital care - for example feeding of patients - is often provided by family members, in some areas.

        Yes we could ship in units - they would help - but can you see Congress authorizing any money to do it?

        "If you're in a coalition and you're comfortable, you know it's not a broad enough coalition." Dr. Bernice Johnson Reagon

        by Denise Oliver Velez on Fri Aug 08, 2014 at 03:06:45 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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