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View Diary: Should ISIS Supporters be Deported? (with poll) (194 comments)

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  •  We allowed the teabaggers (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sandbox, G2geek

    to have their free speech, and even laughed at them. Well, they're now in Congress and have caused not just obstruction but a reversal of rights.

    I don't think ISIS or any other such dangerous group should be permitted to brainwash any more desperate youths into their monstrous cult.

    I believe in free speech for most people, but when they have proven themselves so deadly, I want them removed from society.

    A nice long vacation on a remote, barely-above-sea-level island for all of them.

    •  How will you distinguish them from other Muslims? (2+ / 0-)
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      Samer, marina

      A million Arcosantis.

      by Villabolo on Mon Aug 11, 2014 at 07:42:00 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  You talk to the guys in the video (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        sandbox, G2geek

        Who seem pretty obvious. Use only the most ethical, stringent standards to focus on individuals. Speak out and oppose their speeches, often and everywhere.

        From there, I don't know. I'm not qualified to be president either.

        Given the broad destabilization of the Middle East, their followers will only grow in number--and strength, if they happen to recruit experts in high tech and weaponry, explosives, etc.

        It seems reckless to allow this group to fester in the open, and by our silence give consent. Will we look back and think how blind we were to not recognize their threat? How can we not recognize it when the proof lies all over Iraq?

        •  Yea, better for it to fester in the dark... (1+ / 0-)
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          marina

          I disagree. They are odious and everybody knows it. Nobody is buying it.

          Democracy - 1 person 1 vote. Free Markets - More dollars more power.

          by k9disc on Mon Aug 11, 2014 at 10:34:45 PM PDT

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          •  400 Brits and 500 Germans bought it. (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            k9disc, marina

            Per reputable estimates, those are the numbers of recruits from each of those countries, on the ISIL recruiting tour.  

            I have not seen numbers of Americans, but I would guess somewhere between 100 and 1000, which is a shitty guess but it'll do for now.  Some of them will probably attempt to commit mass-murder terrorist acts in the US.  I would predict about 6 months before the first such are caught by the FBI before they would otherwise have blown something up, and that's a pretty safe estimate.

            The way I'm seeing this, war is war, and recruiters for hostile foreign forces are agents of those forces, thereby subject to capture as POWs and detention for the duration of hostilities.

            The only reason to let any of them run around loose, is to use them as intel targets for catching the people they recruit, before scooping up the lot of them.

            We got the future back. Uh-oh.

            by G2geek on Mon Aug 11, 2014 at 11:37:58 PM PDT

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      •  It could be a challenge, however many (2+ / 0-)
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        mosesfreeman, G2geek

        of the worst radical islamists like ISIS, Al Queda, Boko Haram are proud of their murderous ideology so, when asked, will simply acknowledge their jihadi intent.

      •  the same way you distinguish Operation Rescue... (0+ / 0-)

        ... who are anti-abortion Christian terrorists, from innocent Christians.  

        Most of us on DK can spot the difference between Christian terrorists and innocent Christians.  It's not difficult.  Same case applies to the Muslim universe, and individuals who are trained to spot terrorist material there.

        We got the future back. Uh-oh.

        by G2geek on Mon Aug 11, 2014 at 09:49:09 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  You're over simplifying. I'm just (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          G2geek

          saying deport the worst of the worst_ISIS, AL Queda, Boko Haram, LET.  Yes, there can be civil liberty issues and I'm afraid if we don't as a society address the worst cases of radical islam now--the obvious cases--then the general public will start to lose confidence in our law enforcement. That's happening now in the EU and it's not a positive development.

          •  I don't think we disagree. (1+ / 0-)
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            marina

            Someone, it may have been you, made the point that the rise of unchecked Islamic militants in Europe, may be causing the populations of certain countries to lose faith in the ability of their governments to protect them against terrorism.  And that in turn may be fueling the rise of extreme-right political parties, some of which (such as in Greece) are overtly for-real Nazis.  

            Anywhere Nazis appear, is an emergency by definition, like an Ebola outbreak or a wildland fire in a drought.  

            But I would differ with you as to causes.  From my analysis, the rise of extreme right-wing politics in the present era is driven largely by population/consumption overshoot of resources, and can be expected to get worse as climate change impacts worsen.  The extreme right wing stuff is nothing more or less than genetic and equivalent forms of tribalism enacted via politics.

            In any case, sudden or large influx of "a different tribe" who are out to attack "one's own tribe" produces support for fascist politics.  Therefore, if need be, we should address that factor in order to reduce the threat of fascist politics.

            We got the future back. Uh-oh.

            by G2geek on Mon Aug 11, 2014 at 10:54:07 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

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