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View Diary: IAN: September 2, 2014: Bathrooms! And a footnote to Summer '14. (110 comments)

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  •  I'm checking it out. . . (15+ / 0-)

     photo images-15_zps5a2da895.jpeg

     photo images-14_zpsbb4ffdcd.jpeg

    (Watch out for that frying pan!)

    "Why you sockdologizing ol' mantrap, you!"

    by ejoanna on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 10:27:56 PM PDT

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    •  LOL, that just looks bizarre. (13+ / 0-)

      Love Bucky's ideas...but in execution, not so much.

      Geodesic domes, for example, turn out to have FAR too many places to leak (and if you don't believe me, spend some time in a glass greenhouse. They ARE the best...but oh how you have to fight the leaks if they're not brand-new -- which of course they never are b/c now it's all plastic over a frame of some sort.)

      Yes, I used to work in greenhouses. Why do you ask? ;-D

      English usage is sometimes more than mere taste, judgment and education - sometimes it's sheer luck, like getting across the street. E. B. White

      by Youffraita on Tue Sep 02, 2014 at 12:27:38 AM PDT

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      •  I love Frank Lloyd Wright's work, too-- (15+ / 0-)

        and his last building design was for the Marin County Civic Center.  After 50+ years it is still fabulous to look at and be in (even for jury duty) but when it rains. . . buckets up and down the arcades and other interior walkways. Oopsy.  FLW liked to design 'em and leave 'em--unless you tried to change the place afterward! Then he'd make surprise visits and put things to rights.

        Of course, by the time the MCC was built, FLW had gone to the Great Drafting Table in the sky.  Still, he may haunt the Civic Center at times.

        "Why you sockdologizing ol' mantrap, you!"

        by ejoanna on Tue Sep 02, 2014 at 12:36:55 AM PDT

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        •  Fallingwater. One of the great moments (15+ / 0-)

          of my college career: a friend scheduled a tour for us, and we all drove down and got a tour of Fallingwater. AKA the Kaufman House b/c it was built as a summer retreat for the Kaufmans of the Kaufman Department Store in Pittsburgh. (I might have misspelled Kaufman.) Anyway: Fallingwater is probably the most beautiful residence I have ever seen.

          Cantilevered over a downhill forest stream, Fallingwater was designed to the inch. Difficult to describe all these years later: there are no dressers, the drawers are built into the bedrooms and until the docent opens them, you'd never know they were there. Just f'in brilliant design.

          The art? Sculpture by artists whose work would attract multimillion dollar bids if they weren't owned by whoever controls Fallingwater.

          Perhaps b/c it's modern, and b/c I'm modern: I loved it more than Versaille.

          Really.

          (Although, there was that one Italian palace, on an island, iirc in Lake Como, that was also spectacular, even if it wasn't in perfect shape.)

          English usage is sometimes more than mere taste, judgment and education - sometimes it's sheer luck, like getting across the street. E. B. White

          by Youffraita on Tue Sep 02, 2014 at 12:54:49 AM PDT

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          •  Fallingwater is gorgeous. (11+ / 0-)

            But have you ever lived with that kind of high humidity? The damp destroys everything. And IIRC, that house has been plagued by leaks. Without massive dehumidifiers, you have mold and rot and some really weird problems - like carpets getting "wavy."

            But the biggest problem was that while Mr. Wright was a genius as a designer, he was a lousy engineer. That cantilevered livingroom has caused a world of trouble. It simply wasn't supported well.

            Fallingwater Restorations

            Sometimes reality doesn't live up to dreams. ;-)

            "May the forces of evil become confused on the way to your house." - George Carlin

            by Most Awesome Nana on Tue Sep 02, 2014 at 08:49:01 AM PDT

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            •  yah really, i was about to say "uh oh, cantilever" (7+ / 0-)

              In general, cantilevered anything is bad design.  It's just begging for Ma Nature to smash it.  Earthquakes, any kind of extreme winds, mudslides, etc. etc., "oopsie!"   And all the reinforced concrete pilings & steel beams in the world won't make up for it, unless by producing something that looks strong enough to be a military installation.

              GOTV as if your life depends on it, because somebody's life does.

              by G2geek on Tue Sep 02, 2014 at 09:20:27 AM PDT

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              •  And the livingroom cantilever was supporting (7+ / 0-)

                the bedroom one over it! Horrible design. Add flat roofs and you have this:

                The house that cost $155,000 to build will take $11.5 million to restore, a figure that also includes water treatment, sewage and landscape improvements to be done over the next few years. Restoration of the house will be completed next year.
                From the article reference above.

                "May the forces of evil become confused on the way to your house." - George Carlin

                by Most Awesome Nana on Tue Sep 02, 2014 at 09:30:11 AM PDT

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                •  oy! eeyow! eek! (5+ / 0-)

                  Bedroom over living room is questionable for acoustical reasons but can be made to work.  IMHO stairs are an anachronism that's best done away with, and the major source of indoor serious injuries/fatalities.

                  Put everything on one floor, accessible design.  Smaller floor plan if needed to accommodate lot sizes.  

                  In the Oakland Hills, including after the firestorm, I see plenty of houses that are cantilevered like hell, and all I can think of is, "silly fools, having it burn down once wasn't enough, when the Hayward Fault quake happens, those columns will buckle and the houses will slide down the hills like kids' sleds on snow."  Darwin award seeking behavior.

                  Flat roofs are just nuts.  They never remain flat, they always end up developing low spots that accumulate water and leak into the building.  With climate change and wild storms, it's possible to get so much rain so fast, that it can't all get off the roof fast enough, and ends up finding new leaks into the building.  Or, heavy snow, which can collapse a building.  More anachronisms that need to go.  

                  If a residential building wants a rooftop garden, put a greenhouse atop the flat surface, so the greenhouse can have a pitched "roof."  Though, there is also good reason to put solar up there instead, since it can supply much more of the energy for the building than a rooftop garden can supply food for the building.

                  GOTV as if your life depends on it, because somebody's life does.

                  by G2geek on Tue Sep 02, 2014 at 10:50:35 AM PDT

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                  •  I can think of only one reason for stairs. (3+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    G2geek, Kit RMP, weck

                    If you live in snow country, or another really cold place, have the bedrooms downstairs and living areas up. Saves on heat.

                    Other than that, I like your ideas. My house is a small ranch, built on a slight rise so that water drains away, has a pitched roof (I have added solar panels), and a HUGE gutter system (we get a lot of rain).

                    People who live in earthquake country shouldn't be allowed to build even the smallest cantilever.

                    "May the forces of evil become confused on the way to your house." - George Carlin

                    by Most Awesome Nana on Tue Sep 02, 2014 at 12:54:59 PM PDT

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                    •  there is that... (3+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      Kit RMP, Most Awesome Nana, weck

                      ... however, there are other ways to conserve energy without putting oneself in the position to be unable to get to one's bedroom in the event of any kind of mobility-affecting disability.

                      Really: just watch what happens with the retiring Boomers.  

                      The way to do this, if you have to have upstairs bedrooms, is to also have one downstairs with an attached bathroom.  Then after the kids move out, the parents moves downstairs, and when their kids come home for college vacation or military leave or big family holidays, they can stay upstairs.

                      GOTV as if your life depends on it, because somebody's life does.

                      by G2geek on Tue Sep 02, 2014 at 01:54:53 PM PDT

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                      •  All good ideas. (2+ / 0-)
                        Recommended by:
                        G2geek, weck

                        I have a neighbor who built an enormous chalet. It's actually three stories. Right now it is only a summer home but they tell me they plan to retire to it. I almost laughed out loud. They are in their late thirties now.

                        Give them a few years and I bet they revisit that idea! I know. I'm 67 and in good health. But stairs - no way. As you say, an accident waiting to happen.

                        "May the forces of evil become confused on the way to your house." - George Carlin

                        by Most Awesome Nana on Tue Sep 02, 2014 at 02:24:10 PM PDT

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                        •  three stories with an unhappy ending... (2+ / 0-)
                          Recommended by:
                          Most Awesome Nana, weck

                          ... if they think they're going to do that.

                          OTOH they could have an elevator installed.  Based on an example I saw once, should be about $50,000.  If they can afford an enormous chalet, they can afford the elevator.  Really: tell them they need to look into this.  

                          For us plebians and working class heroes, that sort of thing is unimaginable (seasonal houses, enormous chalets, much less a custom-sculpted statue of a moose on the front lawn and a perfectly restored and functional Model T Ford in the garage, but I digress;-)

                          But we should also keep in mind that their part of the 1% is the harmless part, and the real trouble comes from the top 0.00001%.  In fact we need more wealthy progressives, even if we can't understand why anyone would want a moose sculpture on their lawn;-)

                          GOTV as if your life depends on it, because somebody's life does.

                          by G2geek on Tue Sep 02, 2014 at 03:09:36 PM PDT

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                          •  I take it you know someone with a... (1+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            weck
                            ...custom-sculpted statue of a moose on the front lawn and a perfectly restored and functional Model T Ford in the garage...
                            LOL.

                            My neighbors seem like nice people. But they live in a different universe from me. At this point I have no idea of their politics. In the two years since they built the house, I have seen them less than a dozen times. Something I cannot understand - all that money for a house that stands empty. (They can't rent it out because our HOA doesn't allow that.) A terrible waste.

                            "May the forces of evil become confused on the way to your house." - George Carlin

                            by Most Awesome Nana on Tue Sep 02, 2014 at 03:29:17 PM PDT

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      •  though, i really like those small round windows. (8+ / 0-)

        Like port holes on an oldschool airplane or ocean liner, or a squirrels' nest in a tree.

        One of the all-time ugliest aspects of a lot of modern architecture is what I call the "fishbowl fetish" of glass, glass, and more glass.  The result being that entire interior spaces have zero visual privacy from strangers outside peeping in ("oooh, look at all that loot!, let's go get it!") much less aerial drones (the neighborhood busybody or some stalker).

        Windows should be for looking out, not for strangers to look in, much less climb in through.  

        Though, it would be interesting to design a window with an interior emergency release that can open the entire frame outward for an escape route.  This could be placed at sufficient distance from the window to make it not-possible for someone to smash the glass and reach in and open it.  Unlike present designs of window locks.  Think of something like a window embedded in a hatch that opens on hinges at the top.  (Design-in-progress, this will require more thought before I get something usable here.)

        GOTV as if your life depends on it, because somebody's life does.

        by G2geek on Tue Sep 02, 2014 at 09:15:11 AM PDT

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        •  That is a Dymaxion Deployment Unit... (6+ / 0-)

          ...based on the Butler grain bin. As I understand it, the compund curve roofs don't leak, since they are bolted together with many, many nuts and bolts. I'm surprised nobody makes compound curve grain bin roofs today.

          Float like a manhole cover, sting like a sash weight! Clean Coal Is A Clinker!

          by JeffW on Tue Sep 02, 2014 at 09:26:15 AM PDT

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          •  that sounds familiar. (5+ / 0-)

            I vaguely recall hearing something like that, or it might have been a silo.  

            Though, nuts & bolts can work loose over time due to thermal expansion/contraction cycles.  

            It's surprising that "roofs" are still such a problem.  We already have decent solutions for permanent roofs in the form of steel or tin with the overlaps in the correct places.  Those in turn could be coated with a rubberized epoxy paint to be absolutely water tight.  The coating could be renewed if needed.   All of this without the expense of ripping out and replacing the usual asphalt shingle roofs.  

            GOTV as if your life depends on it, because somebody's life does.

            by G2geek on Tue Sep 02, 2014 at 10:26:15 AM PDT

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        •  My partner wants escape windows in the bedroom, (0+ / 0-)

          so please let me know if you need a place to install these windows as a test.  He is thinking of adding something like french doors, but even in the country, on the front of the house, that is too much temptation for someone to look in and crash through.  We would like them to have divided lights to match the colonial appearance of the @1835 farmhouse.  

          Our project will start after 2017.  He is kind of engineer-y and handy and would be thrilled to have something no one else has!

          If love could have saved you, you would have lived forever. & http://www.dailykos.com/blog/Okiciyap

          by weck on Tue Sep 02, 2014 at 05:03:53 PM PDT

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