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View Diary: Another Bad Idea: Houston to tie teachers' pay to test scores (76 comments)

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  •  Yes, but a little different (none)
    A much better way to handle this is not to tie wages to the student's absolute performance, but to his or her improvement during the time the teacher has them in their class.

    Thus, if the students on average went from 80% to 85% on this year's vs. last year's tests, the teacher did good.  If they went from 80% to 75%, not so good.

    This is of course rather difficult to do precisely, because the tests from one year are not necessarily the same exact difficulty as the tests for the next year, so statistical deviations between years would have to be taken into account for grading, not absolute scoring.

    However, this entire concept presumes that the "testing is god" method of teaching is valid, which is mostly false.  Too much emphasis on testing emphasizes the "teach the test" education paradigm, which tends to ignore such vital areas as critical thinking and all subjects outside of reading/writing/arithmetic.  

    If the tests could be made sufficiently broad that they accurately measure all areas in which students should be progressing, then perhaps this would become a valuable concept.  Unfortunately, many areas are difficult to measure using multiple choice tests, and open answer and essay questions are very difficult to grade when you have 100 million of them to churn through.

    •  Did you read the article? (none)
      Yes or no, did you read the article?

      A much better way to handle this is not to tie wages to the student's absolute performance, but to his or her improvement during the time the teacher has them in their class.

      This quote from you leads me to believe that the answer is no.

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