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View Diary: All About NSA's and AT&T's Big Brother Machine, the Narus 6400 (38 comments)

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  •  Late night math... (0+ / 0-)

    I just checked it again, and dividing 10,000,000,000 by .24 gives us 41,666,666,666. Does this make sense?

    "Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about the things that matter." Dr. ML King, from a jail cell in Birmingham, Alabama in 1963.

    by bewert on Sun Apr 09, 2006 at 05:13:44 PM PDT

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    •  Only average use matters (0+ / 0-)

      The nominal peak speed of the DSL doesn't matter.  The traffic is aggregated before it gets to the Narus box. The average DSL subscriber's load is probably below 25 kbps.  Most of the time, they're not sending much at all, or the computer could be off.

      So if you have an average of 25 kbps, then that's 40 subscribers per Mbps, or about 100,000 subscribers on an OC-48 (2.488 Gbps).  That's the deep packet inspection (application, layer 7) monitoring rate. Just tracing connections at layer 4, it can handle about 400,000 subscribers.

      •  I agree, it can cover far more (0+ / 0-)

        I just wanted to make a point. I fixed the math as below.

        "Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about the things that matter." Dr. ML King, from a jail cell in Birmingham, Alabama in 1963.

        by bewert on Mon Apr 10, 2006 at 02:54:26 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  MATH UPDATE (0+ / 0-)

      This is embarrassing to me so I redid this morning after a couple of cups of coffee.

      I am dividing 10 Gb by 256K: 10,000,000,000/256,000=39062.5 according to my calculator. I just updated the article to read "about 39,000".

      "Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about the things that matter." Dr. ML King, from a jail cell in Birmingham, Alabama in 1963.

      by bewert on Mon Apr 10, 2006 at 09:26:59 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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