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View Diary: Call Out the National Guard: May 1-3, 1970, at Kent State (45 comments)

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  •  I always believed that it was Hoover and the FBI. (0+ / 0-)

    "It's the Government, we're hear to help you."

    by Friend of the court on Sun Apr 30, 2006 at 04:21:49 PM PDT

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    •  probably not Hoover and the FBI (0+ / 0-)

      I doubt Hoover and the FBI had a direct role, although my next piece of this series will examine the interesting story of Terry Norman who was paid by the FBI and was present at the May 4 rally with a camera and a gun. But part of what ticked Nixon and his cronies off was that Hoover wouldn't use the FBI more aggressively. Hoover had a rather strange sense of what was appropriate for the FBI and, allegedly, he did not sanction undercover agents on campus. Of course, there were plenty of them working in the shadows anyway. If you can find a book entitled "Deep Cover" by Cril Payne, it's quite enlightening. Payne was an undercover agent with the FBI in the early 70s and he explains quite well how there were different factions within the agency dealing with the undercover operatives.

      In any case, as I said, I would put the blame more directly on the operatives working out of the White House and Justice Department. My own suspicion is that Kent State is what Attorney General John Mitchell was referring to when he talked about "horror stories." Again, there's a lot more on this in Part I of this series.

      A couple other little notes about J. Edgar Hoover and Kent State:  Hoover was appalled that Allison Krause wasn't wearing a bra that day. Which he knew because the clothes the students were wearing became evidence and property of the FBI. Also, after years of trying to get the parents to demand an investigation into the shootings, they came together in Washington, DC on the 2nd anniversary of the shootings to hold a press conference. Unfortunately, Hoover died 2 days earlier and the parents cancelled their press conference out of respect. Which goes to show how much more integrity they had....  

      We need not stride resolutely towards catastrophe, merely because those are the marching orders. -- Noam Chomsky

      by kainah on Sun Apr 30, 2006 at 04:45:48 PM PDT

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      •  Hoover was into this clear up to (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mitchvance

        the tops of his panty-hose.  FBI did all sorts of infiltration into anti-war movement.  I'm not saying Nixons bunch had clean hands by any means.

        "It's the Government, we're hear to help you."

        by Friend of the court on Sun Apr 30, 2006 at 05:10:29 PM PDT

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        •  certainly into infiltration and disruption (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Friend of the court

          I'm not disputing that. But Hoover himself had a very strange sense of ethics.

          One of the more interesting characters to check out, if you want to pursue this, is William Sullivan. He was head of domestic intelligence at the FBI and was kicked out, unceremoniously, by Hoover. He then became more of a critic of COINTELPRO, much of which he had helped implement and run. Then, one day he went hunting in New Hampshire, and ended up dead in a "hunting accident." Wonder where Dick Cheney was that day?

          We need not stride resolutely towards catastrophe, merely because those are the marching orders. -- Noam Chomsky

          by kainah on Sun Apr 30, 2006 at 05:20:27 PM PDT

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      •  A license to kill... (0+ / 0-)

        was issued that weekend by Nixon/Rhodes/Gen. Canterbury et al. That's my opinion. But one thing you wouldn't know unless you were there, is that the gaurdsmen on campus that day were enraged. Arriving with an attitude toward students who had easy deferrements while they had to work for theirs, the gaurd anger was fanned by wild rumors that that wounded gaurdsmen were being treated at the local hospital. One gaurdsman, in the hospital that weekend for other reasons, was so enraged he had to restrained from going to the campus with revenge on his mind. For weeks after the incident, the gaurd unit in question wanted to go back to kill more students. Remember, the gaurd fired when they were in no immediate danger, which means that they shot because of what had already happened. I believe, as you do, that there were many players in that tragedy who wanted violence to happen and did much to provoke it. The cynical side of me says that the agents provacateurs got what they wanted that day. It was in a peculiar way, the perfect storm.

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