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View Diary: Liberal blogger blocked from Kentucky state-owned computers (192 comments)

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  •  the intarweb doesn't work that way (2+ / 0-)
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    PanzerMensch, snacksandpop

    My point is that there are enough key people who make the internet work who will not stand by and allow the internet to be "Chinafied" that the process will never be completed. A line will be crossed and a battle will start. The internet is more than just a bunch of routers and switches and computers plugged together with cables, it is also a bunch of people who know how to make those routers and switches and computers do exactly what they want.  

    If dkos was blocked by my ISP I would change ISPs. If it were blocked at the backbone level I'd run through a proxy of some sort (and I can guarantee you there will be some really cool programs created to get around the blocking). If, by some nearly impossible magic, it were impossible to access dkos from America then America would have to be a totalitarian dictatorship and I would probably be a refugee living in another country working on defeating the magical American internet filter.

    To answer your question of how I would find out dkos was blocked if the traditional media didn't tell me - the traditional media doesn't tell me a lot of stuff I know about. We live in an age of instant global communication, censorship doesn't work 100% anymore. My guess is that if the government ever started mandating blockage of sites like dkos in America you would see the internet brought down under a blaze of packets launched from every single botnet on earth until they changed their mind.  

    "The power to dominate rests on the differential possession of knowledge" -Foucault

    by Jett on Wed Jun 21, 2006 at 09:43:48 AM PDT

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    •  Your an Optimist (1+ / 0-)
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      sravaka

      I suggest you follow the Congressional hearing a little closer. Last week I heard Sen. Brownback basically asking the FCC Commissioner whose was present if he had the power to block whatever whenever by edict essentially and he said YES. Brownback and his ilk want an Internet cleansed of Porn and political opinion he doesn't like and he could care less about the Constitution. Your right we will push back and it will be a battle but they are winning right now on the legal front. The house has already given the Big Telcoms what they want and you can be damn sure the price they will have to pay is to knuckle under to what guys like Brownback et al. want. Look at how they handed us over to the NSA all of them except for one! No, your wrong they are slowly trying to close the crack in the sky. They have a fairly good handle on the other media and this is the one they are really itching to get a lease on. The party is almost over. Soon the Internet will be nothing more then a State sanctioned shopping mall with politics relegated to the sites the Telcoms are told are ok. Is it Constitutional? Probably not by our reading of the document but look whose on the court now.  They use it as toilet paper remember.

      "It's better to die on your feet then live on your knees" E. Zapata

      by Blutodog on Wed Jun 21, 2006 at 11:26:13 AM PDT

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      •  the internet is not television (0+ / 0-)

        I don't think I'm an optimist. The legal front will not matter too much in the end, either it stops there (for awhile at least) or it stops further down the road. They are absolutely trying to lock the internet down and clean it of porn and rebellion and make it "safe" but it's a nearly impossible task that will have increasingly severe repercussions as they succede in accomplishing it. The internet will never become what you describe because the closer they get the worst the fight will become for them. The internet will rip itself apart before it turns into what you describe. As an analogy - think about the RIAA's battle against file-sharing. They keep escalating their tactics but they are fighting a hopeless battle. They took down Napster easily enough because it was centralized so people invented decentralized systems. They try to go after the users and owners of the decentralized systems so now people are building encryption and improved security models into the software and working anonymously or from countries which won't comply with RIAA demands.

        With the internet as a whole it's the same principle writ large, it is a fight that can never be won. They will never eradicate porn, or file sharing, or unregulated political discussion from the internet because people will always fight back. In a worst case-scenario something like Freenet will be required to run on top of the "internet", but I doubt it will ever even reach that point.

        "The power to dominate rests on the differential possession of knowledge" -Foucault

        by Jett on Wed Jun 21, 2006 at 11:52:31 AM PDT

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        •  I'm with you! (0+ / 0-)

          I sure hope your right and i'm wrong but if China is any indication of what we can expect from these klowns  i'd be lyin to say  I'm not  worried. I wouldn't under estimate how friggin Evil and determined these creeps seem to be.

          "It's better to die on your feet then live on your knees" E. Zapata

          by Blutodog on Wed Jun 21, 2006 at 01:31:26 PM PDT

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          •  China is the future for all of us. (1+ / 0-)
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            Blutodog
            Study it and find its weakpoints now, because eventually the US will replicate the Chinese political system. And, oh yes, their Constitution looks good, too, so there's no help there.

            When you have a one party state (as we do at present) allied with corporations and with control of the media (and soon to include the internet), you've got a state corporation with no easy way to organize against it. For the next 3 years (at least), we are in the fight of our lives and we'd better not lose or it will take many generations to undo the damage, if  it's even possible. That's how important net neutrality is at the moment.


            -7.25/-6.41 Service [to others] is the rent we pay for the space we occupy. -Rev. M. L. King, Jr.

            by sravaka on Wed Jun 21, 2006 at 11:06:01 PM PDT

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    •  YOU would... (0+ / 0-)

      But the question isn't about you. It is, rather, about what the public will do. Even the most restrictive blocking can be defeated by a very clever person, but most people are significantly less clever than that.

      The Shapeshifter's Blog -- Politics, Philosophy, and Madness!

      by Shapeshifter on Wed Jun 21, 2006 at 12:49:57 PM PDT

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      •  things become easier (0+ / 0-)

        Back in the day (pre-Napster) we used to trade mp3's via FTP. The first time I played a game on the internet I had to get TCP/IP working in Dos. Now someone barely computer literate can do either of these things easily. The same will be true of circumventing blocking if it becomes widespread. Freenet is already fairly easy to install, or at least it was last time I played around with it.

        "The power to dominate rests on the differential possession of knowledge" -Foucault

        by Jett on Wed Jun 21, 2006 at 01:00:17 PM PDT

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        •  True, but... (0+ / 0-)

          On the other hand, that's with the weight of established computer organizations behind it. We would be, of course, barred form doing this stuff.

          (Of course, that wouldn't stop us from importing GNU equivalents from Sweden, or wherever. But yeah.)

          The Shapeshifter's Blog -- Politics, Philosophy, and Madness!

          by Shapeshifter on Wed Jun 21, 2006 at 02:06:04 PM PDT

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