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View Diary: Being an atheist in America (242 comments)

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  •  Ah...so we've gone from... (0+ / 0-)

    ..."hate" to "discrimination" now.    

    As I said before - the guy in the diaried article who made the comment about it being "okay to say you hate atheists" was being purposefully inflamatory. He was ratcheting up the emotion in order to manufacture victim status for all atheists, not just those who have been legitimately victimized.  

    The examples you bring up are awful, but they are not really all that different than people experience for airing unpopular opinions anywhere in this country.  I live in the deep south.  If I spoke up about my feelings about the war in the wrong crowd the same things might happen to me (and have happened to others). Ultimately the concept of discrimination is only meaningful in debate to the extent that it is systemic. We cannot make people like each other, we can simply make everybody equal under the law.  

    At the very foundation of this issue is the question of disclosure.  How do people know you are an atheist unless you tell them?  Most politicized atheists I know would like for people of faith to keep thjeir religious beliefs to themselves.  So how exactly is that in line with demanding the right to be liked when one comes "out?"

    •  Hatred (0+ / 0-)

      Ah...so we've gone from..."hate" to "discrimination" now.

      Much of what I described qualifies hatred as well, or even hatred instead of discrimination.

      The examples you bring up are awful, but they are not really all that different than people experience for airing unpopular opinions anywhere in this country. ... If I spoke up about my feelings about the war in the wrong crowd the same things might happen to me (and have happened to others).

      So, you're saying that if you spoke up about your feeling about the war in the wrong crowd, then awful things might happen to you but it wouldn’t related to any hatred?

      I just don't get it. I'm not sure I can conceive of how some of the things I described can occur without the context of hatred.

      Ultimately the concept of discrimination is only meaningful in debate to the extent that it is systemic.

      I'd say that the evidence is there for systemic discrimination against atheists in politics and law (at least with child custody).

      Most politicized atheists I know would like for people of faith to keep thjeir religious beliefs to themselves.  So how exactly is that in line with demanding the right to be liked when one comes "out?"

      Who is demanding a right to be liked? The complaint here is about explicit hatred. I can object to the widespread distrust and hatred of atheists without also simultaneous demanding that people like me. Instead, I simply insist that people not be prejudiced, bigoted gits and not judge my character on the basis of something irrelevant.

      When blacks objected to hatred and discrimination, were they demanding a right to be liked? Of course not — they were demanding to be treated as equally human beings rather than sub-human. They were demanding to be treated with the same respect and consideration that is due to everyone, even if you don't "like" them.

      "If you do the right thing for the wrong reasons, the work becomes corrupted, impure, and ultimately self-destructive."

      by AtheismGuide on Sat Jul 29, 2006 at 11:48:23 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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