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View Diary: Marine Life Series: Tropical Strays, A Photo Essay (32 comments)

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  •  What great pictures! (5+ / 0-)

    Two questions:

    How do you "fish" for them and

    What happens to them after they have grown a bit?

    The law is slacked and judgment doth never go forth: the wicked compass about the righteous and wrong judgment proceedeth - Habakkuk 1:4

    by vox humana on Fri Sep 08, 2006 at 07:30:04 PM PDT

    •  collecting them (7+ / 0-)

      is done using either a seine net or hand picking them while diving. I don't release these because they'll die in the winter so I keep them as long as I can and the really big ones I'll donate to the NOAA aquarium on Cape Cod.

      •  Well, okay. I meant four questions. (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        WI Deadhead, roses, Fabian

        The third being:

        That enhanced photo of the gulf stream is also amazing! Do you know if there has been any evidence of significant change in the stream since they have been able to get such data? I know some would be El Nino / La Nina, but might some be global warming as well? (oops, was that two questions? Oh no, was that one? And how about that...? ...? ...?)

        And the "fourth:"

        Have you noticed any increase over the years in the frequency of tropical visitors to our fair shores (in Rhode Island)? I suppose every global tragedy should have its miniscule silver lining....

        The law is slacked and judgment doth never go forth: the wicked compass about the righteous and wrong judgment proceedeth - Habakkuk 1:4

        by vox humana on Fri Sep 08, 2006 at 07:51:29 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  gulf stream (5+ / 0-)

          As far as I know there hasn't been any unusual changes to the current.

          However, the number of tropicals I find increases every year and they are arriving earlier. This year was like nothing I've ever seen as far as total number and variety.  I think the water is warming earlier each year so the early arrivals that would normally not survive make it through the spring and early summer.

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