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View Diary: The Case of the Disappearing U.S. Attorneys (131 comments)

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  •  Feinstein's good for something! (13+ / 0-)

    What a nice development.  I hope she uses this issue to get her teeth nice and bloody.

    My apologies to students who took my U.S. Government class in the 90s: evidently the Constitution doesn't limit Presidential power after all. Who knew?

    by Major Danby on Tue Jan 16, 2007 at 06:55:31 PM PST

    •  This looks like a poorly (8+ / 0-)

      thought out scheme to ease chimpy's last two years. Clumsy and heavy handed, with no consideration to recent memory--such as November. I am sure they thought they could get away with it. It's getting to the point where it's fun and easy with these guys. Another reason why any Senator's should reconsider Presidential ambitions. They got themselves a full bore Turkey Shoot available. Why miss that fun?

      it tastes like burning...

      by eastvan on Tue Jan 16, 2007 at 07:21:02 PM PST

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      •  A seminar in authoritarianism (20+ / 0-)

        George Bush seems to be doing his best to illustrate every possible abuse of power an imperial president can commit.  Mayhap he's doing the country a service, leaving us a roadmap to follow when we have to walk back the last half-century's usurpations of constitutional principles.

        At any rate, he seems bent on running up the score on impeachable offenses, even if this one doesn't count.  Nice to see him continuing to chip away at his potential defenders in the impeachment jury.

        -4.50, -5.85 Conventional opinion is the ruin of our souls. -- Rumi

        by Dallasdoc on Tue Jan 16, 2007 at 07:30:19 PM PST

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        •  He hasn't declared martial law......yet but (5+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          MJB, Dallasdoc, abbeysbooks, greenearth, lynmar

          Nice to see him continuing to chip away at his potential defenders in the impeachment jury.

          it is a diminishing pool isn't it?

          it tastes like burning...

          by eastvan on Tue Jan 16, 2007 at 07:36:09 PM PST

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          •  And quite likely, (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            greenearth

            at the end of the day, all he and all his coterie will be left with is the shallow end of the gene pool.

            it tastes like burning...

            by eastvan on Tue Jan 16, 2007 at 07:37:47 PM PST

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            •  This can be stopped if senators have guts... (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              lysias, sodalis

              Here's how to stop this BS:  Democratic senators must stand up and say that they will block every single Bush judicial nomination unless all of the new U.S. Attorneys -- including Rove's close personal friend who just took over in Arkansas -- are formally nominated and subject to confirmation by the senate, and will resign if not confirmed within 120 days.

              Bush certainly has the authority to ask the current U.S. attorneys to step aside -- for example, a new president almost always asks for the resignation of all of the U.S. attorneys appointed by the previous president.  This episode is a bizarre and aggressive use of that authority.  But it is absolutely unacceptable for Bush to try and fill all of these important positions with cronies and try to evade the normal confirmation process in the senate.

              So this is how liberty dies -- with thunderous applause.

              by MJB on Wed Jan 17, 2007 at 12:16:16 AM PST

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          •  They better get rid of that martial law thing (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            eastvan, greenearth, agnostic

            <h1>fuckin' quick!</h1>

            •  FINALLY. someone gets it. (0+ / 0-)

              This is a prelude to Martial Law, nothing less.

              This is an extremely troubling development, one which should cause every freedom loving citizen to quake in their boots.

              They control the executive, they control the FBI, the CIA, the NSA, and now, they control the last indie group within the federal legal system.
              Please note that I ignore the judiciary. We can ignore them. Certainly the Bush Cabal has done so of late. With military tribunals able to try US citizens, with US attorneys taking orders from General Gonzales, deciding which, if any, cosntitutional rights may be allowed to apply to any circumstance, and with George Bush now taking over control over each state National Guard (he did this late last year), we now face an imperial presidency with no oversight, no reins, and nothing to stop them from a complete take over.  

              The final nail in America's coffin? some botched domestic terra event, probably a dirty bomb in Detroit, or an anthrax attack on the water supply in Milwaukee, resulting in thousands more dead - probably planned by or at least, conveniently ignored by our feckless leaders.

              In the United States, doing good has come to be, like patriotism, a favorite device of persons with something to sell. - Mencken

              by agnostic on Wed Jan 17, 2007 at 06:08:58 AM PST

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              •  the last straw will be... (0+ / 0-)

                ...something awful that Bush, Cheney, and the GOP will have been found to have been doing all along. It will make Watergate look like taking more than one free cookie. And it will be so obvious as to be indefensible, with no stooge in place to pardon them.

                After all, the only reason we put up with Nixon's pardon was our collective fear that the GOP would vanish. Look at what we've brought on ourselves by continuing to ignore crime at the very highest level of our government.

                We put a Band-Aid on a boil, it became an abcess, and now everything stinks.

        •  doesn't count? (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          gogol, Dallasdoc, bayside, greenearth

          if the speculation is correct that this purge is intended to eliminate "troublemakers" like carol lam, who are following down corruption leads, it most certainly counts.

          obstruction of justice, baby.  conspiracy.  all the watergate goodies.

          l'audace! l'audace! toujours l'audace!

          by zeke L on Tue Jan 16, 2007 at 08:40:20 PM PST

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          •  Congress made this legal (5+ / 0-)

            Damn them for not reading the Patriot Act.  It's too nuanced a case for a political process like impeachment.

            Now, impeaching Gonzales, that's a different matter, perhaps.

            -4.50, -5.85 Conventional opinion is the ruin of our souls. -- Rumi

            by Dallasdoc on Tue Jan 16, 2007 at 08:49:02 PM PST

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            •  obstruction is not nuanced at all (0+ / 0-)

              you can be charged with obstruction of justice for shredding documents, for example.  normally it's perfectly legal, but if you're doing it to destroy evidence, that's something else entirely.

              l'audace! l'audace! toujours l'audace!

              by zeke L on Tue Jan 16, 2007 at 09:56:01 PM PST

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            •  Feinstein voted for Patriot Act reauthorization (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              lynmar

              I wrote to her and urged her not to vote for it.  She did it anyway.  I wrote her and told her that she was unprincipled in voting for it.  She sent me a form letter explaining why the Patriot Act was actually OK.  So I wrote her a letter and told her that I would never vote for her again.  I voted for her primary challenger, and withheld my vote in the general election.

              Now she's standing here bitching about the Patriot Act.

              She is not our friend.

            •  Impeaching Gonzales (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              zeke L, Dallasdoc

              would probably be a more productive (both long and short term) action than impeaching George W. anyway.

              D'ya think maybe the Congresscritters might learn to be a bit more efficient and read/think before they vote on stuff, rather than having to go back and fix everything they screwed up on with do-overs???

              Me, I'm a little skeptical on this one.  Congress often seems to be about one giant make-work session for the next group.

              Words can sometimes, in moments of grace, attain the quality of deeds. --Elie Wiesel

              by a gilas girl on Wed Jan 17, 2007 at 09:40:26 AM PST

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          •  If it is (0+ / 0-)

            an attempt to delay corruption investigations it may well for a short time but for unintended reasons. It would ultimatly lead to so many other investigations that the whole process could bog down. For a while.

            it tastes like burning...

            by eastvan on Wed Jan 17, 2007 at 12:24:25 AM PST

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        •  I am very worried (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          gogol, Dallasdoc, bayside, greenearth

          Bush is taking little mini-steps on his way to a totally authoritarian fascist dictatorship.  He already has many Halliburton concentration camps built all over the country.  When everything is in place, he will just declare martial law and then make himself president-- for life.  I hope it does not take more than just impeachment by Congress and then conviction by the Senate to remove him.  He is slowly raising the heat under the pot so the frog won't jump out before it is cooked.

          •  Can't see that working (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            sodalis, trudyashchiksya

            It might have worked in 2004, but it won't now.  To enforce martial law, he'd need the military to cooperate.  Now that he and Don Rumsfeld have thoroughly antagonized the military, aside from Jack D. Ripper die-hards and suckups like Peter Pace, I suspect he runs a great risk of general mutiny if he tries anything like this.  Lots of military troops and officers still remember what they're defending, and it ain't George Bush.

            -4.50, -5.85 Conventional opinion is the ruin of our souls. -- Rumi

            by Dallasdoc on Tue Jan 16, 2007 at 09:22:23 PM PST

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      •  are they able to go after Fitz with this? (5+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        gogol, high uintas, nehark, sodalis, greenearth

        he's awfully close to Cheney...

      •  One thing about these guys... (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        a gilas girl, Dallasdoc, greenearth

        is their incompetence, once their actions hit the light of day.

        •  It truly is a constant thread, (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          greenearth, agnostic

          every time a beam of light the scurrying incompetant roaches. If only a few well directed beams had been directed earlier. How much would be differant if more had payed attention earlier?

          it tastes like burning...

          by eastvan on Tue Jan 16, 2007 at 08:28:54 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  This could not have happened... (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            gogol, eastvan, greenearth, agnostic

            until the public started to wake up to the lies, corruption and incompetence.

            It will be interesting to see how much else turns up in the coming months.

            •  Oh the taps (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              greenearth

              are open. If anything, the  electorate will be suffering from revelation/scandal fatigue in a few short months. It is just starting. Especially now that the MSM is paying occaisional attention.

              it tastes like burning...

              by eastvan on Tue Jan 16, 2007 at 08:46:19 PM PST

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            •  watch for secret signing orders, presidential (0+ / 0-)

              orders and secret legislation that even congress won't see (it will be too secret for them).

              Already, with respect to HSA and TSA, we  Americans are not permitted to know what is and what is not permissible in airports, nor are we allowed to learn why some of us end up on no fly lists.

              SECRET LAWS? SECRET LISTS? SECRET TRAVEL RULES?

              How can I put this bluntly? THIS IS BULLSHIT!

              In the United States, doing good has come to be, like patriotism, a favorite device of persons with something to sell. - Mencken

              by agnostic on Wed Jan 17, 2007 at 06:11:41 AM PST

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      •  clumsy and heavy-handed... (0+ / 0-)

        but so many of their schemes are.  They've never actually been subtle, and never needed to be since there was so little opposition.  

        Words can sometimes, in moments of grace, attain the quality of deeds. --Elie Wiesel

        by a gilas girl on Wed Jan 17, 2007 at 09:36:23 AM PST

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    •  Sen Feinstein (California for Feinstein - CA) (0+ / 0-)

      She's the West Coast's answer to Joe Lieberman.

      I think I'd rather be represented by Arnold Schwarzenegger.  Warren Beatty did say that Arnold had become a Democrat, after all.

      •  She's not *that* bad (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        sodalis

        I'd say more like the West Coast's answer to Hillary Clinton.  Maybe Bill Nelson.

        If Schwarzeneggar becomes a Democrat, I'll be less worried about who he'd appoint to a Senate vacancy.  Until I'm reassured on that point, he's still a Republican.

        My apologies to students who took my U.S. Government class in the 90s: evidently the Constitution doesn't limit Presidential power after all. Who knew?

        by Major Danby on Wed Jan 17, 2007 at 02:49:20 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

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