Skip to main content

View Diary: The Libertarian spoilers (259 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  Source? (14+ / 0-)

    This tends to support Kos' argument:

    In the past, our research shows, most libertarians voted Republican—72 percent for George W. Bush in 2000, for instance, with only 20 percent for Al Gore, and 70 percent for Republican congressional candidates in 2002. But in 2004, presumably turned off by war, wiretapping, and welfare-state spending sprees, they shifted sharply toward the Democrats. John F. Kerry got 38 percent of the libertarian vote. That was a dramatic swing that Republican strategists should have noticed. But somehow the libertarian vote has remained hidden in plain sight.

    Want empirical evidence?  I'm a Libertarian that was registered and mostly voted Republican for 28 years.  In 2006, I voted a straight ticket for the first time - a straight DEMOCRATIC ticket.

    I found my way to dKos from an essay Kos posted on Cato.org.  I'm not sure the Dems are a permanent home for Libertarians, but believe me, we've bolted from the Republicans in droves!

    It does not require a majority to prevail, but rather an irate, tireless minority keen to set brush fires in people's minds - Samuel Adams

    by Red no more on Wed Jan 31, 2007 at 08:20:38 AM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  Cato or ACLU? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      HeyMikey

      I'm generalizing here but are you a Cato libertarian (more meaning an absolutist free market, anti-tax libertarian) or a civil libertarian? If you are in the first group you tend to vote Republican, no matter what.

      •  I guess I started out Cato- (0+ / 0-)

        and moved toward ACLU.  I'm more of a social libertarian but an economic populist.  Government definitely has a role in our complex society, particularly in helping the disadvantaged and checking unbridled corporate power.

        I don't think any self-respecting libertarian could support this authoritarian regime.  It goes against every libertarian principal - save none!

        Based on the article I linked, I strongly believe fleeing libertarians had a big impact on the elections.  Maybe that's because my allegiances shifted so dramatically.

        It does not require a majority to prevail, but rather an irate, tireless minority keen to set brush fires in people's minds - Samuel Adams

        by Red no more on Wed Jan 31, 2007 at 08:37:52 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Well only slightly (0+ / 0-)

      Let's say you adjust the dem and repub votes by giving 20% of the lib vote to the Democrat and 72% to the Republicanist.  You get:

      <th>Contest</th><th>D</th><th>R</th><th>L</th><th>Adjusted D</th><th>Adjusted R</th>
      Missouri Senate104704910012384750410565491035440
      Montana Senate19830219545510324200366202888
      IN-091101851005039920112169107645

      So MT-SEN is the only one that actually got flipped.

      •  Q. E. D. (0+ / 0-)

        That's control of the Senate right there.

        The part of the equation that's hard to quantify is: How many libertarians vote libertarian?  I would venture that the block that voted libertarian represents only half of libertarian voters.  My feeling  is that in MO, for example, 47,000 libertarians voted Dem and 47,000 "Republicans" voted libertarian.

        It's more of a sliding of libertarians to the left of the spectrum than allocating those who voted L to either party.

        Of course I have no proof of this other than my own experience.  I am registered R, and usually vote R or L.  However, this time I voted straight D.  So a self-described L went from R to D.  Does that make sense?  This libertarian would not be reflected in your analysis.

        It does not require a majority to prevail, but rather an irate, tireless minority keen to set brush fires in people's minds - Samuel Adams

        by Red no more on Wed Jan 31, 2007 at 10:45:47 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site