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View Diary: Kossacks Under 35: Wardrobe Edition (281 comments)

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  •  does not.... (0+ / 0-)

    "getting ahead" in this context = "making money"?

    I don't mind people dressing up at all. I've had a few colleagues who loved to wear suits and looked good in them. More power to them, I say. But when you consent to be judged by something other than your abilities, you are selling out. Maybe you think the goal is worth the price. I don't.

    Through tattered clothes great vices do appear / Robes and furr'd gowns hide all. (King Lear)

    by sagesource on Thu Mar 29, 2007 at 10:13:31 PM PDT

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    •  Short answer. (0+ / 0-)

      No.  For me, anyway, it means getting to make a difference doing what I love to do (practicing law for the good).  I think I've explained what I think pretty well.

      1-20-09 The Darkness Ends "Where cruelty exists, law does not." ~ Alberto Mora.

      by noweasels on Thu Mar 29, 2007 at 10:15:50 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Well, no intention to offend. (0+ / 0-)

        But I still don't see how that depends on your clothing. They'd throw you out of a legal aid clinic if you showed up poorly dressed?

        Through tattered clothes great vices do appear / Robes and furr'd gowns hide all. (King Lear)

        by sagesource on Thu Mar 29, 2007 at 10:24:02 PM PDT

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        •  No, I'm sure they wouldn't. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          kath25

          But that case I mentioned, up in the block quote about my cutoffs and pink high tops?  That case ended up being pro bono -- the law firm footed the bill (which ended up costing, in billable hour speak > $250,000).  And the partners at my firm would not, I think, have agreed to have let me keep at it had I not earned mojo early on for my WORK, which I would not have been able to have done had I not toed the line with what I was wearing.  I needed to LOOK like a serious D.C. lawyer to be accepted as a serious D.C. lawyer.  I never wanted to be a serious D.C. lawyer to MAKE MONEY.  I wanted to be a serious D.C. lawyer so I could convince the courts (and believe me, coming from a highly respected firm gets you points out of the box with judges) that the cases I cared about were worth listening to.  It wasn't ever about the money -- it was about being taken seriously so I could do what I wanted to do for clients and cases I cared about.

          1-20-09 The Darkness Ends "Where cruelty exists, law does not." ~ Alberto Mora.

          by noweasels on Thu Mar 29, 2007 at 10:32:50 PM PDT

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    •  Me neither. (0+ / 0-)

      I am going to become a professor, and I am sure that I won't be tenured if I wear jeans and a t-shirt to class every day.

      I want to be successful, I want to dress in a manner that commands respect from my unruly students!

      Believe me, I'm not in it for the money! :-)

      •  hmmm.... (0+ / 0-)

        Actually, they're far more likely to care about your publication record.

        And you don't want to know about the things students say behind the backs of well-dressed profs who are bores or incompentent (not to say that you are either).

        I studied ritual as part of my doctoral program. I understand something, if certainly not everything, about the wires you're trying to pull and the buttons you're trying to push. But learning the theory of it gave me an intense distaste for the practice. It was like learning the rules of an elaborate scam.

        As the Chinese proverb goes, the man who carved the Buddha statue is never seen praying in the temple.

        Through tattered clothes great vices do appear / Robes and furr'd gowns hide all. (King Lear)

        by sagesource on Thu Mar 29, 2007 at 10:28:30 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Well... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          noweasels

          after my many many years in education, I'm pretty sure I know what's said behind professors' backs. So don't worry about that. And I assure you I am both competent and scintillating.  

          I am rather young, and will be on the job market when I am 29 or 30. I need to be able to look mature enough to be a professor, and professional clothes will help.

          I am sorry if you have an overall problem with the fact that society judges people based on their attire. I think of it in terms of personal expression, but if you want to suggest that I've been inculcated into an oppressive system that's your choice.

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