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View Diary: The mechanisim to end democracy? (29 comments)

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  •  I hear you . . . (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pb, debedb

    But isn't it true that if Cheney were to succeed W in a normal circumstance he'd still "only" be the head of the Executive Branch of government?  

    In this scenario, he'd be both the President and the head of the "continuity" government, which doesn't include congress or the judiciary?

    Or an even scarier scenario, if that's possible; can yo image Karl Rove, Josh Bolten or Steven Hadley stepping up to run this thing?

    Scary indeed . . .

    ~j

    •  I'll let Ron Paul do the talking (6+ / 0-)

      (The entire document, of which the below is a small excerpt, can be found here  He's attacking "The "Continuity of Government Commission" (COGC), spearheaded by the Brookings Institution and the American Enterprise Institute":

      Existing Constitutional Provisions are Adequate

      It is important to understand that the Constitution already provides the framework for Congress to function after a catastrophic event. Article I section 2 grants the governors of the various states authority to hold special elections to fill vacancies in the House of Representatives. Article I section 4 gives Congress the authority to designate the time, manner, and place of such special elections if states should fail to act expeditiously following a national emergency. As Hamilton explains in Federalist 59, the "time, place, and manner" clause was specifically designed to address the kind of extraordinary circumstances imagined by COGC. Hamilton characterized authority over federal elections as shared between the states and Congress, with neither being able to control the process entirely.

      COGC posits that states could not hold special elections quickly enough after a terrorist act to guarantee the functioning of Congress. But even COGC reports that the average length of House vacancies, following the death of a member until the swearing in of a successor after a special election, is only 126 days. Certainly this period could be shortened given the urgency created by a terrorist attack. We should not amend the Constitution simply to avoid having a reduced congressional body for a month or two.

      In fact, Congress often goes months without passing significant legislation, and takes long breaks in August and December. If anything, legislation passed in the aftermath of a terrorist event is likely to be based on emotion, not reason. The terrible Patriot Act, passed only one month after September 11th by a credulous Congress, is evidence of this.

      <snip>

      States have a wide variety of electronic and telephonic technology at their disposal to speed up the process of special elections. Consider that popular television shows hold votes that poll millions of Americans in a single night! Yet COGC ignores alternatives to standard voting and incorrectly assumes that states will be in disarray and unable to hold elections for months.

      •  I wish (0+ / 0-)

        Dems would listen to Ron Paul about these people.  He's the only one who has consistently called them out for what they are.  It's maddening, and every day we get one step closer to hell in this country.

        Republicans, so long captivated by a turd-blossom, now find themselves trapped in a pile of shit surrounded by maggots.

        by enough already on Fri May 11, 2007 at 12:53:39 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Late to chime in, but (0+ / 0-)

      I keep having flashbacks to the TV show Babylon 5 at the end of the first season where the VP (who bears a passing resemblance to Cheney in fact!) has the Prez assassinated and then takes over and declares martial law "to handle the current crisis only".

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