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View Diary: Could the 2008 Election be Like the 1932 Election? (Part 2) (218 comments)

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  •  Maybe not to you... (1+ / 0-)
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    Justus


    ...but to my mind this comes tantalizingly close...

    There’s a wall around Washington and we need to take it down. The American people are on the outside. And on the other side, on the inside, are the powerful, well-connected and the very wealthy. That wall didn’t build itself or appear overnight.

    For decades, politicians without convictions and powerful interests gathered their and their stones and their mortar, and they went to work. They went to work to their interests, to block the voice of the American people, and to stop our country’s progress. They went to work to protect, defend, and maintain the status quo...

    We have a choice in this election. We can keep trying to shout over that wall. We can keep trying to knock out a chink here and there, to punch little holes in it and hope our voices get through. We can settle for baby steps, half-measures and incremental change, and try to inch our way over that wall and toward a better future. Or we can be bold and knock it down.


    I'm well aware this speaks to a broad vision but not to specific proposals. But then, FDR's greatest moments are when he led first through portraying his broad vision of what needed to be done, and what America could be.

    The fact is that the average man's love of liberty is nine-tenths imaginary, exactly like his love of sense, justice and truth. - H.L. Mencken

    by two roads on Sun Dec 02, 2007 at 03:37:31 PM PST

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    •  Outsiders (4+ / 0-)
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      badger, wu ming, cardinal, greeseyparrot

      Maybe I'm jaded, but I've heard that speech before, from Jimmy Carter, from Ronald Reagan, from Bill Clinton, and any number of candidates who didn't make it to the White House, all of them claiming to be coming to Washington to change the culture of DC.

      I think there will be a staggering loss of human life out of all proportion to the stakes involved... Sen. George McGovern, March 1965

      by darrelplant on Sun Dec 02, 2007 at 03:55:51 PM PST

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      •  Indeed (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Asak, badger, darrelplant

        I'm glad someone else noticed that it's just boilerplate "outsider candidate" rhetoric.  Since that post has no attribution, I would have guessed Carter or Clinton (yes, I've read the other diaries, so I know who it really is).

        Having said that, though, presidential scholars (I'm thinking Skowronek specifically) would argue that the time is right for a Democrat -- any Democrat -- to become a transformational president.  They need not necessarily run on radical platforms.  They just need to be there to pick up and reshape the pieces of the crumbling Republican regime.

        You campaign with the media you have, not the one you wish you had. I wish my two favorite candidates would figure that out.

        by cardinal on Sun Dec 02, 2007 at 04:09:35 PM PST

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        •  Hoover (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          sawgrass727

          One major difference between this and the 1932 election is that there's no incumbent. It's possible (although I hope incredibly unlikely) that one of the GOP candidates could provide a message of change that the voters would find appealing.

          FDR, while he might not have been specific in his plans, was definitely promising something different. That was the whole point of the New Deal speech.

          I think there will be a staggering loss of human life out of all proportion to the stakes involved... Sen. George McGovern, March 1965

          by darrelplant on Sun Dec 02, 2007 at 04:17:18 PM PST

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          •  Possible, but not likely (0+ / 0-)

            Judging from the primary debates, I find it unlikely that will happen.  If anything they are all trying to out-Bush Bush.  

            Don't like XOM and OPEC? What have YOU done to reduce your oil consumption? Hot air does NOT constitute a renewable resource!

            by Asak on Sun Dec 02, 2007 at 07:51:41 PM PST

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            •  Change (0+ / 0-)

              Change doesn't necessarily need to be in the direction you or I might find appealing.

              Part of Bush's appeal to people in 2000 was his rhetoric of a new type of conservativeism. Ronald Reagan used a grand appeal to a dream of an America from long ago to rope in a lot of Democrats. He was just a more appealing personality than Carter to a lot of people. Not me, but I could see why people got suckered by him.

              I don't think Romney or McCain or Guiliani has that capacity, but if Huckabee manages to push through the first rounds, people might go for him. If the Democratic candidate fails to go for the jugular like Gore v. Bush in 2000, then it's anybody's guess.

              I think there will be a staggering loss of human life out of all proportion to the stakes involved... Sen. George McGovern, March 1965

              by darrelplant on Sun Dec 02, 2007 at 09:45:58 PM PST

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      •  Yes, you are jaded. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        darrelplant, Nestor Makhnow


        I can recognize it in others, because I'm jaded too.

        But Carter talked about being an outside-the-beltway politician, and the non-Ford/Nixon, not fundamental systemic change. And Reagan never came close to even thinking the words above.

        Here's what it comes down to in my jaded eyes. I want at least the message to reflect my beliefs.

        But beyond that, I think the intent is sincere, and I confirm that belief with the least logical but most meaningful reason I have. John Edwards' tragedy with his son, and Elizabeth's return of cancer are very close to my own life experiences, and I personally know the transformational power of those experiences, and what it can do to one's world view.

        So through your jaded eyes place me sitting next to Mulder, with an 'I want to believe' poster tacked to the wall. But in the end, that's all any of us really have until our candidate makes it into office, and either delivers or disappoints.

        That, or to give up all hope entirely that meaningful change will ever bless us again.

        The fact is that the average man's love of liberty is nine-tenths imaginary, exactly like his love of sense, justice and truth. - H.L. Mencken

        by two roads on Sun Dec 02, 2007 at 04:16:38 PM PST

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