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View Diary: Wikileaks Under Attack: California Court Wipes Wikileaks.org Out of Existence (262 comments)

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  •  Similar attack has taken place to another (31+ / 0-)

    fas.org also know as Secrecy News and Federation of American Scientists, which has thousands of files of formerly classified, or unclassified, but hard to get files has this up on their site.

    The Army move on February 6 marks the latest step in an ongoing withdrawal of government records from the public domain.

    "It was a policy decision to put it behind the AKO [Army Knowledge Online] firewall and to restrict public access," said Don Gough of the system development division at the Army Training Support Center at Fort Eustis, Virginia, which operates the Reimer Digital Library.

    The move came as a surprise since only unclassified and non-sensitive records had ever been made available at the Library site.

    Isn’t it true, Secrecy News asked, that the only documents that had been accessible to the public were those that had been specifically... "‘Approved for public release,’ yes," said Mr. Gough, completing our sentence. "I understand your concern," he added.

    Army Blocks Public Access to Digital Library

    "a state that tortures is always a state of hypocrites." John Locke

    by SmileySam on Mon Feb 18, 2008 at 07:13:11 AM PST

    •  Sounds like this deserves a diary (10+ / 0-)

      all on its own. Were the documents mirrored anywhere?

      The illusion of freedom will continue as long as it's profitable to continue the illusion. -FZ

      by lightfoot on Mon Feb 18, 2008 at 07:17:37 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  fas's files are still available at this time (10+ / 0-)

        but the Army Library was one of their important source for finding what they brought into the public domain. You can still download what they have as far as I know. I did download many files just in case.

        "a state that tortures is always a state of hypocrites." John Locke

        by SmileySam on Mon Feb 18, 2008 at 07:20:18 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Increasing unhustified classification (10+ / 0-)

          of information is a growing problem. It serves several nefarious purposes. Firstly it stifles scientific and technological progress and helps the current oligopoly maintain its lead in economic competitiveness. It also allows for a greater filtering of the government economy and especially the people that work in that economy. Even working in the certain areas of the high tech civil economy these days often requires a top secret clearance, and there is no appeal or accounting for how arbitrary the process is for granting these "meal tickets" into the economy. There a been much suspicion among people that I have talked to that during the Bush years granting clearances has become highly politically charged, and even so much as donating money to a Democratic candidate may be enough to disqualify you.

          The illusion of freedom will continue as long as it's profitable to continue the illusion. -FZ

          by lightfoot on Mon Feb 18, 2008 at 07:37:20 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Increasing Unjustified Classification (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            oldjohnbrown, Jules Beaujolais, kyril

            (in title above)

            The illusion of freedom will continue as long as it's profitable to continue the illusion. -FZ

            by lightfoot on Mon Feb 18, 2008 at 07:41:37 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  I Think It May Be More Simple Than That (5+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            nancelot, bablhous, mrcoder, SmileySam, kyril

            Every time the government takes an action like this and gets away with it, we the shoeple become more accustomed to it happening.  The next time it's easier for the thugs and the time after that even better.

            I believe much of what Bushco has done is without any purpose other than to demonstrate time and again that they are in charge and we can't do a damn thing about it.

            Gore to Richardson to Edwards to ?

            by creeper on Mon Feb 18, 2008 at 08:15:41 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  I believe there are more instances (4+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              bablhous, lightfoot, SmileySam, kyril

              of the abridgement of freedom of the people by gradual and silent encroachments by those in power than by violent and sudden usurpations.

              James Madison

              So, yes, I completely agree with creeper, and Madison.

              It's getting drafty in here. Somebody close the war.

              by mrcoder on Mon Feb 18, 2008 at 08:57:50 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  In general, I would agree (0+ / 0-)

                the freedoms that we lose in a slow, creeping fashion, perhaps over generation, are the ones maybe not even realized and therefor perhaps most damaging. But it is also changes that occur under the cover of the ever-expanding Black Budget, unseen by regular mortals, that also threaten us all by their very nature due to lack of oversight.

                The illusion of freedom will continue as long as it's profitable to continue the illusion. -FZ

                by lightfoot on Tue Feb 19, 2008 at 05:55:12 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

          •  Not even classifying, just making inaccessible (6+ / 0-)

            I teach at a military college.  All our courses are unclassified, in part because have lots of foreign students, and most of our offices don't have classified internet access, safes for classified material, etc.

            We're increasingly running into problems where other DoD organizations move unclassified documents off of password-protected but still regular internet servers (like the "AKO" thing mentioned here), and instead onto the totally separate classified internet.  

            They do this partly for convenience -- many military people spend most of their time on classified computers, which can't be hooked up to the regular internet at the same time.  But mostly its because there is such paranoia about computer security that increasingly organizations are wanting all email, documents, etc on the classified network, not because they are secret, but because hackers can't access the classified net (it has no connections to the regular internet, totally separate wires).  

            That ends up screwing outfits like the academies and war colleges, allied militaries that usually don't have access to our classified net, other US government agencies (like State, Homeland SEcurity, Justice, Congress, etc) that generally aren't wired up to the DoD classified net, etc.  It also increases costs since managing classified systems is vastly more intensive.  

            •  I am familair with these issues (7+ / 0-)

              from a previous job. There are also issues of increasingly lableling documents "confidential" even if they are not classified, an of course eport restrictions and related hassles on software projects. But what I am talking about is more related to what HUD   Secretary Alphonso Jackson revealed on May 06, 2006: Government contracts were being awarded preferentially  to supporters of George Bush and the Republican Party. I believe that this potentially extends much deeper. Given the advanced state of database technology, and the known propensity for the Bush administration for keeping records on a large number of people, it is an easy leap of logic to see that expanding the domain of classified information and thereby the need for security clearances is a way to exclude non-Bush supporters from the vast government economy.  Just as writers and actors were put out of work during the McCarthy ere, the Bush administration has set up a mechanism to exclude a huge number of workers from their chosen professions, without leaving a trace xcept in a complex database. Makes McCarthy look like a piker.

              The illusion of freedom will continue as long as it's profitable to continue the illusion. -FZ

              by lightfoot on Mon Feb 18, 2008 at 08:45:01 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Power corrupts (7+ / 0-)

                Given the advanced state of database technology, and the known propensity for the Bush administration for keeping records on a large number of people

                This stands in stark contrast with their ability to recover their own email.

                Re- the millions of White House email messages that "were not saved" or which were "deleted" in violation of US law.

                It's not really "ability" per se, it's "willingness" to comply with law that this WH tends to repeatedly demonstrate problems with.

                Liberty may be endangered by the abuse of liberty, but also by the abuse of power.

                James Madison

                It's getting drafty in here. Somebody close the war.

                by mrcoder on Mon Feb 18, 2008 at 09:05:07 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

    •  Even blocks Air Force, Navy, USMC (6+ / 0-)

      Army Knowledge Online is just that, Army Knowledge Online.  

      THough it is being used as the basis for a DoD-wide password-based suite for webmail, IM/forums, and document distribution, that isn't up yet.  Right now, generally only Army affiliates (soldiers, civilian staff, contractors, etc) get access.

      So, if a Marine Corps officer wants to look up Army doctrine on an issue and see how it compares to USMC doctrine, that's now difficult.  I think there may be some other repositories, but the Reimer collection was certainly the easiest and best-known.  

      Great example of jointness in action -- not!

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