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View Diary: Sunday Puzzle -- Would I Lie to You? (145 comments)

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  •  spoiler second column up (2+ / 0-)
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    Nova Land, nonnie9999

    Roll in the hay?

    The first column looks like anagrammed 'Franklin Mint.'

    I'm kidding. I'm not kidding. Yes, no, maybe.

    "I suppose it's never any surprise that a sham, when it falls apart, falls apart so quickly and thoroughly." - from Sea of Tranquillity by Paul Russell

    by wayoutinthestix on Mon May 19, 2008 at 08:30:23 PM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  nonnie, (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Nova Land, nonnie9999

      Nova pooh-poohed sin somewhere above so that line is probably wrong. The good news is Nova didn't say anything about 'in' for HHH so that line might be right.

      Also, somewhere Nova mentioned that well-known ratio would be better than famous ratio. Sine is fairly well-known because of trigonometry.

      "I suppose it's never any surprise that a sham, when it falls apart, falls apart so quickly and thoroughly." - from Sea of Tranquillity by Paul Russell

      by wayoutinthestix on Mon May 19, 2008 at 08:47:27 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  i think the adjective is throwing me.... (2+ / 0-)
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        Nova Land, wayoutinthestix

        i was thinking that there is some ratio out there named after a person, but i couldn't find anything on google other than euclid.  famous or even well-known sounds like something specific, rather than something general like sine. that nova is a devious one!
        p.s. hiya stix!

        I didn't get Jack from Abramoff...I'm not a Republican!

        by nonnie9999 on Mon May 19, 2008 at 09:22:58 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Well, the most famous ratio (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Nova Land, nonnie9999

          is probably 'golden' because I think that was in The Da Vinci Code. Other words used to describe the golden ratio are extreme, mean, medial, divine, the Greek letter phi, and if you want a name, mean of Phidias.

          If 12 is mean, 11 could be men, leaving en for 10. Ens would be better but I'm desperate :(

          (Hi, back at ya.)

          "I suppose it's never any surprise that a sham, when it falls apart, falls apart so quickly and thoroughly." - from Sea of Tranquillity by Paul Russell

          by wayoutinthestix on Tue May 20, 2008 at 06:51:13 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  yeah, golden is the only one that comes up... (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Nova Land, wayoutinthestix

            when you google, except for those with names that are way too long.  oh, wait, i just googled again, and i take that back.  there is the mach ratio and the berry ratio and brequet (or breguet--spelled both ways in the same sentence) and the sharpe ratio. the last is a bit tantalizing, but i don't have time to play right now (are harps sometimes white?  nahhh, that's not it).  
            i didn't know the golden ratio was from the davinci code.  if i ever get on jeopardy and that is the final answer, i will split my winnings with you, stix.

            I didn't get Jack from Abramoff...I'm not a Republican!

            by nonnie9999 on Tue May 20, 2008 at 04:08:24 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  famous failure on my part (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        nonnie9999, wayoutinthestix

        ... somewhere Nova mentioned that well-known ratio would be better than famous ratio.

        Yes, that was back up in the 15th comment in the thread ("Some minor help").  [I wish that comments in these threads were numbered; it would make it a lot easier to refer back to them.]

        Writing that clue as "famous ratio" was a mistake on my part.  (I think I had the word famous on the brain, since I see in looking back that I used it in 3 separate clues: famous ratio, famous non-attack, famous quest.)

        That was a poor word choice on my part, for which I apologize.  What I meant by the clue was simply a well-known or familiar ratio.

        I'm not saying that sine is or isn't the word I had in mind (so please don't read more into this than I'm saying) but it's something that I would be perfectly satisfied to have as the answer to this particular clue if I were on your side of the table.  In contrast, I would not consider extreme, mean, medial, or divine to be acceptable (and would be grousing in the comments if one of those did turn out to be the intended answer) because none of those is a ratio.

        A few of the clue answers may be hard to figure out at first. (The Humphrey clue, for example.  And the  90s song.  And the blue clue.) It's likely you will need to figure out the verticals in order to crack these.  But once you do hit upon the answers, my intent is that you'll be able to look at them and say, Oh, yes, of course!  

        If you have to squint too hard at an answer, then it's probably not the answer I have in mind.  White sin, to give an example, doesn't pass the squint test for me.  "White lie" would be fine; and lying is a sin; but that still places sin at too far a remove from white for my taste.

        (And I hope it goes without saying that you should feel free to complain loud and long if any of the answers do turn out to be unsatisfactory.  That'll help me do better on future puzzles.)

    •  comment on verticals [no spoiler] (2+ / 0-)
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      nonnie9999, wayoutinthestix

      Just a quick comment regarding verticals, which I didn't include this week in the introduction so as not to go on for too long but which may be worth noting and storing away.

      My aim in constructing these puzzles is going to be to provide verticals which don't need to be anagrammed. I liked the stunt a  couple months ago, where the verticals answers began halfway down one column and then looped around, so might try a variant on that some time.  But in general I want people to be able to guess the verticals well before solving all the clues, as help in solving those clues.

      In my first puzzle I had to anagram one of the columns, but that's because it was a 6x5 puzzle -- the more columns one includes in the puzzle, the harder it is to construct a puzzle in which all the vertical columns provide a meaningful word (especially a meaningful word related to the other vertical words).  There was no such problem this time around: the vertical columns are familiar un-unagrammed words which you should have no difficulty reading or understanding once you fill them in.

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