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View Diary: Burning a Source: A Cautionary Tale for Potential Whistleblowers (220 comments)

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  •  You should read Jane Mayer's book, The Dark Side, (21+ / 0-)

    which contains an account of his case.  After you read that, see if you still feel that he "went abroad to take up arms against our men and women in the military."

    Or if the ideals for which our military should be fighting were besmirched by Rumsfeld, Bush, Cheney, the CIA, and David Addington.

    These people have done more damage to this country than John Walker Lindh could have ever achieved.

    Welcome to the New America.

    by Fasaha on Mon Dec 15, 2008 at 11:40:39 AM PST

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    •  Hey.. don't foist Rumsfeld's and Bush's (0+ / 0-)

      idiotic foreign policy on me.

      But just because they have done the damage that they have does not excuse Lindh.  Let him serve his time, for all I care.

      "Those are my principles, and if you don't like them... well, I have others." - G. Marx

      by Skeptical Bastard on Mon Dec 15, 2008 at 11:56:43 AM PST

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      •  I'm not trying to foist their foreign policy on (5+ / 0-)

        you.  But your comment reveals that you haven't read much about the Lindh case, which is somewhat like the conviction of Don Sigelman:  a fraud, a hoax, a deception.

        I am serious when I say that after you have read more about what actually went down with Lindh, you should revisit the issue.  I don't see how you could still feel the same way. But if you do, at least it would be based on the facts of his case.

        Welcome to the New America.

        by Fasaha on Mon Dec 15, 2008 at 05:25:03 PM PST

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        •  A few questions for you (0+ / 0-)
          1. Was Lindh at the Qala-i-Jangi prison?
          1. Did Lindh talk to American forces before the uprising and not identify himself as an American?
          1. Did Lindh participate in the Qala-i-Jangi uprising?

          If the answers to 1 & 2 are yes, then he could have warned the British, American and Northern Alliance troops about the impending uprising, because there are eyewitnesses who said he knew about it.  He did not.

          He could have identified himself as an American.  He did not.

          He could have made much better decisions that would have given him better treatment, saved lives, and saved him from a wounded leg.

          Yet, John did none of these things.  He chose to stay with his friends and fight.

          Was his treatment after the fact deplorable? Yes, indeed it was.  It does not, however, take away from his action.. actions of his own free will, that put him in that predicament.  Let him rot, for all I are.

          "Those are my principles, and if you don't like them... well, I have others." - G. Marx

          by Skeptical Bastard on Tue Dec 16, 2008 at 06:39:06 AM PST

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          •  Thanks for responding. I think we disagree on (0+ / 0-)

            the facts, which is fine.

            I'm not sure what decisions he could have made that would have resulted in better treatment, since many others, who were simply in the wrong place at the wrong time, got similar treatment:  that is to say, were not treated in accordance with the laws of war.

            Which is the whole point, as far as I am concerned.

            But I respect your position, and I suspect we just disagree.

            Welcome to the New America.

            by Fasaha on Wed Dec 17, 2008 at 08:27:56 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

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