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View Diary: HR Law - The Hidden Metrics that Decide your Career (81 comments)

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  •  It's cool to vent (2+ / 0-)
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    Pinko Elephant, Darmok

    But seriously, what happened to you doesn't happen to everyone.  You got unlucky and fell through the cracks.  Doesn't mean you'll continue to, or that these rules apply to most people.

    Also, I have to ask: if you'll "never, ever, ever be able to get the cert"...then why are you still in that field?  You claim there's essentially zero chance of you progressing and getting a good job, but you're still studying for the CPA?  Why?

    Lots of people change fields; it sounds like you should.  Find out what's growing.  Not every industry has a treadmill that you can't get back on if you fall off.

    Yes, there are progressives in the rural South. 50 States.

    by Racht on Tue Jan 27, 2009 at 12:22:03 PM PST

    •  Actually (0+ / 0-)

      >>Doesn't mean you'll continue to, or that these rules apply to most people.<<</p>

      Even though the incentive for HR people I've talked to is to deny these rules all of them either readily agreed that they did this or they got all defensive and closed mouthed (remember, this is technically illegal).  So I'd say these rules apply to everyone but the lucky 1 in 10,000 who make a lifetime out of defying odds.  

      >>You claim there's essentially zero chance of you progressing and getting a good job, but you're still studying for the CPA?  Why?<<</p>

      Because I got stupid and spent the money on the study material and if I spent the money I'm going to use the study material.  And on the plus side studying for it is helping keep my skills sharp, so studying for it hasn't been the total waste you think.

      >>Lots of people change fields; it sounds like you should.  Find out what's growing.  Not every industry has a treadmill that you can't get back on if you fall off.<<</p>

      This country absolutely shits on your if you try to reinvent yourself.  If I ever had kids I'd raise them with the facts, which are that you'd better get it right the first time because they won't give you a second chance.  Unless a brand new field opens (which we haven't had in this country since circa 1995) you'll hear "I'm sorry, we choose a candidate with a better grounding in the field/industry/etc." (code for:  We found someone younger than you who's been doing this his whole life) pretty much continually.

      "An army of principles can penetrate where an army of soldiers cannot." - Thomas Paine

      by Mister Gloom on Tue Jan 27, 2009 at 12:26:25 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  My career path (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Catte Nappe, Rachel Q

        I'm actually in HR, but in compensation. I've done a bit of hiring, so I take a bit of exception to your misconception rule number one (it's more work to have someone breathing down your neck b/c they don't have someone filling the position you need filled, than it is to just hire someone), and HR Law number two (see my comments further down the thread).

        Your HR Law number one is about right, though harshly-worded, from my experience. And, my fiance would agree that her MBA hasn't gotten her anywhere she's been that she wouldn't have gotten without, until her current job (for which she's being groomed for a director position upon the impending retirement of her boss).

        I've probably been lucky, but I'm in the field I want to be in, due to the way I carved a niche for myself. I believed I always had the aptitude, though not the resume, to be in compensation. So, I got an HR position (low person on the totem pole), got a few projects here and there, and impressed the right people. Now, in the age of layoffs, I'm (almost) indispensible (crossing my fingers). Additionally, I'm working on my certification, with employer funds, which is essential for my resume in future companies (most compensation positions want to see some work towards certification).

        •  Generally what happens is... (0+ / 0-)

          >>ve done a bit of hiring, so I take a bit of exception to your misconception rule number one (it's more work to have someone breathing down your neck b/c they don't have someone filling the position you need filled, than it is to just hire someone)<<</p>

          Now bear in mind this has been heavily experienced by the ongoing fighting between governmental agencies and USA Jobs (which is kind of the US Governments staffing agency):  Someone tries to breath down your neck and you simply say "We didn't get any qualified applicants" and there's nothing they can do (even if its not strictly true).  

          >>HR Law number two (see my comments further down the thread).<<</p>

          I have test data to back this up.  If it was true for those people why (outside of specialized areas like science and academia which are not the norm) wouldn't it be true for most?

          "An army of principles can penetrate where an army of soldiers cannot." - Thomas Paine

          by Mister Gloom on Tue Jan 27, 2009 at 01:27:17 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Specialized Areas (0+ / 0-)

            In the cases I cited, they were special cases. My fiance is in the civil engineering field, and she was able to do do first interviews over the phone. In all cases, we were willing to move if she got the position, or, in this latest case, were already on our way.

            WRT the positions I've hired for, they were either division heads, or high-level engineering positions for tech firms.

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