Skip to main content

View Diary: Morning Feature: Conspiracy Theory 103 - Conspiracies of Convenience (Plus Kossascopes) (178 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  They have always done this kind of thing (12+ / 0-)

    I do believe that when they recognized that was the consequence of their actions, rather than retrench and try to correct the problem, they doubled-down in an effort to maximize their short-term returns at the expense of long-term stability.

    And I think this is the consequence of the "culture" many of the players share.  I can't explain it any other way.  I think of what most of us would do and I believe that most of us would look at the mistakes we had made and the chaos it had caused and we would feel shame along with a desire to fix things.  

    These guys don't think that way. Instead they view it, as Crissie has described, as just another opportunity to make more money.  And they do this even though they, as individuals, already have so much money they couldn't possibly need more.  For them, money no longer means the same thing as it does to the rest of us.  It doesn't mean the difference between eating and paying the bills or not being able to do so.  For them, dollars in the account are like little points indicating whether they're winning or losing some ridiculous game they all play with one another.

    They are enculturated to attempt to "win" at all costs and so, to the rest of us, their behavior is inexplicable because we don't share that enculturation.  We were taught in kindergarten that sharing is better than stealing, looting, and hoarding.

    So some people attempt to explain what appears inexplicable by coming up with a secret society having overarching goals of world domination.  But in most cases, this isn't what's going on.  What is going on are the natural kneee-jerk reactions of a privileged group who respond to any crisis or opportunity by trying to grab more.

    They don't need to work at a conspiracy.  Most of the money and power are in their hands and they're going to win in any situation until the playing field is leveled to a far greater degree than it is now.

    "The time for justice is always right now!" - Samantha Booke, Wiley College debate team, 1935

    by Edgewater on Fri Apr 03, 2009 at 04:52:48 AM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  Yes, often true. (8+ / 0-)

      In some cases the actors have a legal duty to try to benefit by whatever opportunities events present.  To some extent, we all have a duty to try to make the most of the opportunities life offers - even when the opportunities come in the form of tragedy - so long as we're not causing harm by doing so.  For example, I'm among many who have suggested that we should see our current economic crisis as an opportunity to reconsider our values and our economic system, and that we should make the most of that opportunity ... again so long as we don't cause harm by doing so.

      Good morning! ::huggggggggggggs::

      •  G'morning Crissie :) (10+ / 0-)

        This idea:

        I'm among many who have suggested that we should see our current economic crisis as an opportunity to reconsider our values and our economic system

        is one I definitely agree with.  

        I think that, while it is true, that some actors have a legal duty to try to benefit by whatever opportunities events present, that they also have a legal duty to not break laws while they do it.  And, the simple legal duty to try to benefit doesn't dictate the route they take to gaining the benefit.  That is, they aren't obligated to take destructive stupid routes.  And yet, as far as the financial crisis goes, we see that this is what they did.

        They didn't choose to play the game within existing rules, they chose to lobby to change the rules so that they could avoid government regulations.  The duty to try to benefit doesn't, IMO, require that but this is what they did.

        So I don't tend to chalk up the current collapse to the "corporate person" legal duty so much as I chalk it up to wanton disregard on the part of individual players for anything other than their own pursuit of profit regardless of the cost to everyone around them.  Human individuals made these decisions.

        I chalk this up to the corporate "culture" where more is good and excess is even better no matter that even a two year old could see that problems were going to rise from current strategies.

        This is where I hope the investigation of our economic system will have an impact.  I hope it will move us toward a mind-set that acknowledges the existance of this corporate culture and finds it unacceptable.  We can't make it go away - but we should regulate the hell out of it and we should lock those regulations beyond the reach of corporate lobbiests.

        "The time for justice is always right now!" - Samantha Booke, Wiley College debate team, 1935

        by Edgewater on Fri Apr 03, 2009 at 05:28:47 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site