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View Diary: Health Care Series 20090611:  Acetaminophen Concerns (147 comments)

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  •  Part of what's confusing me here is that today (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    churchylafemme, Snud, Translator

    my doc told me he could not call in Lortabs to the pharmacy and he gave me a written script. Also, I had made a comment about wanting to avoid acetamenophen. He's generally an extremely knowlegable man.

    How well known is it that lortab and percocets contain acetaminophen? Why would he say he can't call in lortabs?

    I can't seem to think very clearly tonight. Forget about proper spelling! Am I garbling what you two are saying?

    •  Look and see it if is (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Snud, TheFatLadySings

      Lortabs or Lortabls ASA.  There is a difference.

      Warmest regards,

      Doc

      "It is not the content of the post, it is the name recognition that makes the Rec List"

      by Translator on Thu Jun 11, 2009 at 07:56:59 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Hydrocodone APAP. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Snud, Translator

        Now I have to go read through the comment thread to see what that means because I can't remember.

        •  You got the (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          TheFatLadySings

          acetaminophen ones.  Go back to your physician and rid yourself of frustration with his ignorance.  He should write you a better prescription, and reverse both charges  for office calls, and offer to pay for the prescription that he foolishly made.  Hold his feet to the fire, and if he is not very helpful, offer to publish his name, address, and specialty here.

          I suspect that he will buy the drugs back and poison other patients with them, calling them "free samples", write you a new prescription, and never want to see you again.

          Warmest regards,

          Doc

          "It is not the content of the post, it is the name recognition that makes the Rec List"

          by Translator on Thu Jun 11, 2009 at 08:28:05 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  He's really a very nice man and a good (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Translator

            physician. None of that is actually necessary. I'll just talk to him about the issue.

          •  please (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Translator

            I am concerned about the comment that TFLS's doc couldn't call in a script for Lortab, but there are some variations in state laws, too.

            But the doc cannot buy the drugs back. The doc didn't dispense the drugs, so can't buy them back. And it is illegal to give out "samples" of narcotics, except in very, very rare cases (the clinic I worked in did so on an extremely limited and highly regulated way for patients being treated with suboxone.)

            Diversity may be the hardest thing for a society to live with, and perhaps the most dangerous thing for a society to be without - W S Coffin

            by stitchmd on Fri Jun 12, 2009 at 12:35:21 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  ASA is aspirin instead of tylenol (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Translator, TheFatLadySings

        But the DEA looks at it the same: Their logic is no one will knowingly snort or shoot up aspirin, caffeine or tylenol in any large quantity. So, these compounds get Schedule III status. It's that simple.

        This ain't no party. This ain't no disco. This ain't no foolin' around!

        by Snud on Thu Jun 11, 2009 at 08:07:18 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Unless your state law prohibits it (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      stitchmd, Translator, TheFatLadySings

      There are no federal laws that prohibit calling in a Schedule III drug over the phone.

      I'm not aware of a state that prohibits it but NY has some pretty strict prescribing laws.

      Your doctor may have been mistaken or not telling the truth.

      Percocet for some reason was deemed "too fun" even with the tylenol and/or aspirin. (Percocet vs Percodan) and are still considered Schedule II and cannot be phoned in. They contain oxycodone which, even when mixed with other compounds, is always a Schedule II.

      This ain't no party. This ain't no disco. This ain't no foolin' around!

      by Snud on Thu Jun 11, 2009 at 08:05:32 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Hmm... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Snud, Translator

        There would be absolutely no reason for him to lie about it and I know him quite well. He's an honest guy.

        Awhile back, I released a report to the press about overdose deaths in our county, pointing out very high rates of drug mixing, often involving pharmaceuticals. It caused a big stir. At the time, the overdose deaths were being labelled "heroin deaths." The Department of Health epi team produced their own study a few years later, after a change in Governors, and determined we needed stricter controls in our state on pharmaceuticals. It became harder to obtain narcotics. I have a feeling that one of the changes was controls on calling in certain scripts. In fact, now that my controlled substances are wearing off, I'm almost sure of it.

        So inadvertently, I may have been the cause of my doc's inability to call in my script!

        •  You can check your state laws (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Translator, TheFatLadySings

          But again, I don't think the Fed cares about calling in a Schedule III drug over the phone. AFAIK, Lortab in any formulation (tylenol or aspirin) is Schedule III.

          Little known trivia: You can even phone in a Schedule II drug... as long as you produce a written prescription within 24 hrs. But that kind of defeats the purpose of phoning it in!

          This ain't no party. This ain't no disco. This ain't no foolin' around!

          by Snud on Thu Jun 11, 2009 at 09:23:49 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

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