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View Diary: Pique the Geek 20090621.  Drugs of Abuse III:  the Psychedelic Indoles (143 comments)

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  •  When I was a kid (9+ / 0-)

    growing up in Arkansas, people talked about smoking jimsonweed.  I never tried it, but you can get high on it. I know it is a member of the same family as the deadly nightshade, so that was enough to put me off from even thinking about trying it.  It is one of those things I never got around to researching.  Your thoughts?

    It is horrifying that we have to fight our own government to save the environment. - Ansel Adams

    by Otteray Scribe on Sun Jun 28, 2009 at 06:23:45 PM PDT

    •  I actually covered that in Part I (10+ / 0-)

      of this series, the Oddballs.

      It turns out that Jimpson weed contains significant amounts of atropine, a very powerful drug.  In addition to its mental affects, it also inhibits sweating, thus making heatstroke a real danger amongst users in hot weather.  In addition, atropine is more of a delirium producer than a true psychedelic, with severe danger arising from inguring oneself.

      Warmest regards,

      Doc

      Time for real health care reform, not just to patch the patches.

      by Translator on Sun Jun 28, 2009 at 06:26:56 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Heard a number of horror stories about Datura (6+ / 0-)

      including long periods of blindness.  Strongly not recommended.

      moderation in everything ... including moderation

      by C Barr on Sun Jun 28, 2009 at 06:49:41 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  There use to be an asthma smoking... (7+ / 0-)

      ... tobacco that contained belladonna or jimsonweed IIRC it was called Dr. Schiffman's Asthma smoking tobacco.
      It could be brewed as a tea and drunk - it could, however, seriously fuck you up.

      The optimist thinks this is the best of all possible worlds. The pessimist fears it is true. J. Robert Oppenheimer {-8.25 / -5.64}

      by carver on Sun Jun 28, 2009 at 06:51:25 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Euell Gibbons mentions (6+ / 0-)

        the use for asthma in one of his books.  With better, more effective, more specific, and much safer drugs available, no one should do that.

        Warmest regards,

        Doc

        Time for real health care reform, not just to patch the patches.

        by Translator on Sun Jun 28, 2009 at 06:53:47 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Didn't he die from aspirin induced bleeding (4+ / 0-)

          in his stomach?

          moderation in everything ... including moderation

          by C Barr on Sun Jun 28, 2009 at 07:01:48 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  That is my understanding. (4+ / 0-)

            He had severe arthritis, and aspirin was widely used for it then, although newer drugs are replacing it for many patients now.  That seems like it was in the late 1970s.

            Warmest regards,

            Doc

            Time for real health care reform, not just to patch the patches.

            by Translator on Sun Jun 28, 2009 at 07:05:14 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  Not from aspirin induced ulcer (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            G2geek, Translator, C Barr

            He had a ruptured aorta.  It was a probably a dissecting aneurysm of the aorta with his Marfan's Syndrome a contributing factor. Official cause of death was "heart attack."

            It is horrifying that we have to fight our own government to save the environment. - Ansel Adams

            by Otteray Scribe on Sun Jun 28, 2009 at 08:10:29 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Shades of John Ritter! (4+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              G2geek, C Barr, joycemocha, Otteray Scribe

              Now it all makes sense.  I thought that the aspirin story might not be accurate, but that is the urban legend.

              For those of who are not hip to Marfan's:

              It is a genetic defect (heritable) that has to do with the quality of the proteins in connective tissue.  Very recently discovered is that it is a so-called "silent" mutation in that the proper amino acids are incorporated into the proteins, but an aberrent codon in the mRNA (and the parent DNA) is used.  This affects the rate at which the protein is produced at the ribosome, causing some distortion in its tertiary structure because the folding of the protein as it is formed is affected by the rate at which it is constructed.  This has been known only a few months.

              Without naming names, someone whom I know very well has had loose ligaments all of her life, and her son was born with pectus excavatum, has been in the 95% percentile for height (length when he was little), and has an aortic arch on the extreme high side of normal size, but it is stable.

              Unless you are on the operating table with a qualified chest cutter working on you when it happens, the recovery rate from a dissecting aorta is just about zero.

              Thanks for clearing this up for me.  Now you know why I keep saying that I learn more than I could possible hope to teach writing this series.  Gibbons, by the way, is one of my idols.

              Warmest regards,

              Doc

              Time for real health care reform, not just to patch the patches.

              by Translator on Sun Jun 28, 2009 at 08:23:16 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  Dissection of the aorta can cause (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              G2geek, Translator, Otteray Scribe

              heart attack if the dissection goes across the opening of a coronary artery.

    •  I recall an article in the New Yorker ca. (4+ / 0-)

      fifteen years ago about a fellow who grafted tomato stems onto a nightshade plant (same plant family). The tomatoes concentrated the toxic ingredients. He gave a bunch of the tomatoes to a neighbor who used them in a salad. Several people died and others became very ill. CDC epedemiologists had a hard time figuring it out.

      •  I am not convinced that this (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        G2geek, C Barr, Otteray Scribe, Coastrange

        is actual fact.  Please do not get me wrong, I am in no way accusing you of anything dishonest.  It just seems to me that there are a few things wrong with the story.

        First, tomatoes are extremely easy to grow from seed, thus reducing the need to graft them.  The reason that fruits, such as apples, peaches, etc. are all grafted is that they are impossible to grow from seed, in that you get a different variety than what you planted.  Tomatoes are not like that.

        Second, grafting tomatoes, a soft fleshed plant, would be extremely difficult.  It is relatively easy to graft woody plants, but the delicate nature of annuals (both tomatoes and nightshade) would make grafting next to impossible without advanced facilities.

        I'll root around tomorrow, but I suspect that the story was snark.  However, I could well be incorrect.

        Warmest regards,

        Doc

        Time for real health care reform, not just to patch the patches.

        by Translator on Sun Jun 28, 2009 at 08:07:31 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  very bad stuff, don't mess with it. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Otteray Scribe

      A true psychotomimetic (psychosis-mimicing compound), nothing but bad trips, and the exceptions prove the rule.  

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