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View Diary: Me as a Mixed Blood (54 comments)

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    •  Ho, Winter Rabbit. (1+ / 0-)
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      Winter Rabbit

      May I ask a difficult question? At what time does the percentage of "blood" cease to matter in anything other than personal interest? I don't mean to sound glib, but 16% Native American blood is like saying that one is 1/8th Dutch, and as such means pretty much nothing. I mean, you either are or you aren't, and when aren't you? Should I, as someone some of whose ancestors came through Ellis Island as landless Potato Famine victims, go back to the Auld Sod and demand some kind of reparation? Should my Frankish parts wrathfully demand that the Pope give me my souvereignity back? When, in short, do we cease to be "other" and become "every"?

      I too was adopted, after lying in the crib in the hospital for nearly a week after being born. The back of my head is pretty flat! I've wondered all sorts of things about attachment disorder and my inability to enjoy human touch. My biological mother was a cruel drunk who abused her other children, biological or otherwise. My adoptive parents were kind, loving and attentive. I think I am what I am because of them, not because of what I am made of. I can't chose which ancestry to be a part of--the Irish, the Frisian, the Frankish, the whatever else is in the mix. I choose instead to be related to everyone, truly mitakuye oyasin.

      Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

      by crose on Fri Jul 24, 2009 at 09:58:18 PM PDT

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      •  Thank God that you feel no hurt or confusion (6+ / 0-)

        about who and what you are. Many others have a more difficult time. I always tell people that I am one hundred percent black and part everything else. My blood and genes are from from Ireland, France, England (paternal), a Chinese great grandfather, a straight from India via indentured labor great great grandmother and black blood from different countries in Africa. But the only blood that I feel wholly connected to is the black - African - blood. I saw the Prez at Cape Coast Castle at the door of no return and I felt as if my heart was breaking. I felt all the pain and suffering and humiliation as if I were right in the midst of that human storm. We are all uniquely different and we all deal with our loss and pain and sorrows in our own unique way.

        ((((((((((((Winter Rabbit))))))))))))

        Max Ehrmann (author of Desiderata): Whatever else you do or forbear, impose upon yourself the task of happiness; and now and then abandon yourself to laughter.

        by JoanMar on Fri Jul 24, 2009 at 10:27:46 PM PDT

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        •  Why would you believe (0+ / 0-)

          that I feel no hurt or confusion about who and what I am? My journey to accepting that the people I came from and the people to whom I went were people--flawed, imperfect and trying their best--was a long, painful one. I could say that I belong to no group, to no family. Ultimately I belong to the human race, that mammalian species that has never settled in its wanderings, that has never known peace for very long and that has never ceased in its desire to be one.

          Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

          by crose on Mon Jul 27, 2009 at 01:30:16 AM PDT

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      •  O, I just included the % (6+ / 0-)

        because I had to convert it to fraction. The traditional ways had already found me years before I learned I had any Native American blood. It went from a "them" to a "mine" though at the time. But I didn't have a clue then either. Take that back, I had one and a lot of unchecked assumptions.

        She nourishes us; that which we put into the ground she returns to us. Big Thunder

        by Winter Rabbit on Sat Jul 25, 2009 at 09:09:00 PM PDT

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      •  Crose, reminds me of a story. (5+ / 0-)

        The Buddha sent the mourning woman door to door, to find a woman who had not lost a child.

        She nourishes us; that which we put into the ground she returns to us. Big Thunder

        by Winter Rabbit on Sat Jul 25, 2009 at 09:17:17 PM PDT

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        •  I believe it was (1+ / 0-)
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          Winter Rabbit

          to find a household that had not suffered a death. And of course the woman could not find one and discovered her oneness with all of humanity.  

          Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile away and you have their shoes.

          by crose on Mon Jul 27, 2009 at 01:32:25 AM PDT

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