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View Diary: Compelling: Ohio recount: Stealing votes in Columbus-- INVESTIGATE DAMSCHRODER (166 comments)

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  •  So what you're saying is . . . (none)
    . . . assuming that even in wards where turnout was reported as low, turnout was still high enough so that all the voting machines should have been occupied all day in all wards.

    Thus a steady stream of voters across the county means that each voting machine should have had pretty much the same number of votes in it at the end of the day. Indeed, machines in wards with the longest lines (those with fewer voters per machine) should have had MORE votes in them since the wards presumably they stayed open later to compensate.

    Yet the final totals show quite the opposite. The total votes per machine is LESS in those wards with more voters per machine, despite the machines being at full capacitry throughout the day.

    The only apparent explanations are that either a lot of ballots were spoiled or the machines simply stopped counting.  Yet even if the ballots were spoiled they would presumably still be included in turnout calculations.  Which means . . .

    Great point. To verify, we need to tabulate turnout from physical check-in lists, to see just HOW MANY people actually turned out on election day.   If more people turned out than were counted by the machines, this is indeed PROOF that the something is fishy with the counting.

    •  Actually, its more mundane (none)
      Yet the final totals show quite the opposite. The total votes per machine is LESS in those wards with more voters per machine, despite the machines being at full capacitry throughout the day.

      The only apparent explanations are that either a lot of ballots were spoiled or the machines simply stopped counting.

      Actually, you've got it backwards.  Total votes per machine were higher in wards where there were insufficient machines.  

      In precincts with a greater-than-average number of machines-per-voter (disproportionately Bush precincts), half the precincts had over-capacity machines, and only one was at VERY high capacity.

      In wards with insufficient machines (overwhelmingly Kerry precincts), almost all precincts were over-capacity, and more than half were at VERY high capacity.

      Low turnout rates in those precincts with insufficient machines reflect that many voters must have simply given up on voting because of excessively long lines.  If precincts had been able to accomodate all excess demand simply by staying open late and letting those in line finish up, on average we would see higher votes-per-machine in those precincts, but we should expect roughly similar turnout totals.  It is the absurdly low turnout numbers in those precincts (anything under 45%) that reveal the scope of the problem.

      Civilization is a tenuous thing; it lies no thicker on the mind of a man than humanity on the skin earth.

      by Silent E on Tue Nov 30, 2004 at 11:49:15 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

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