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View Diary: Sometimes They Even Talk Alike (190 comments)

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  •  ...'based on stance and not on science'? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Leo in NJ

    Paid Troll wrote ..."Wolve's see black and white, blue eyes usually are a disadvantage do to UV susceptibility."  

    Fact or urban myth?

    Please support.

    •  Only the first part: "Wolves are color blind" n/t (0+ / 0-)
    •  Rods and Cones (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Cali Scribe

      Common veterinary science, what do you want?

      http://nice.purrsia.com/...

      http://www.uwsp.edu/...

      Dogs do not breed on visual impression but more on scent and dominance.   Eye color is not even on the list.  My point is an extremely well written article riddled with scientific fallacies confuses the issue.

      I don't care if I fall as long as someone else picks up my gun and keeps on shooting. Che Guevara

      by Paid Troll on Sun Oct 11, 2009 at 08:26:10 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  You lie (0+ / 0-)

        You originally claimed that wolfs  see in black and white.

        As the article you link says, dogs are red-green color blind, NOT blue-gray color blind.

        Moreover dogs have at least some 'cones', which wouldn't be the case if they can see "only in black and white."

        I see you couldn't find the relevant science eon wolf vision, but that's ok, given dogs are very closely related.

        •  Seeing yellow blue (0+ / 0-)

          is the same as black and white  it is two color.  sensitivity to the spectrum of yellow and blue does not mean you interpret the color this way.  This is common knowledge.

          I don't care if I fall as long as someone else picks up my gun and keeps on shooting. Che Guevara

          by Paid Troll on Sun Oct 11, 2009 at 08:43:01 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Wrong again (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            happymisanthropy

            Dogs see yellow blue AND gray:

            Neitz confirmed that dogs actually do see color, but many fewer colors than normal humans do. Instead of seeing the rainbow as violet, blue, blue-green, green, yellow, orange and red, dogs would see it as dark blue, light blue, gray, light yellow, darker yellow (sort of brown), and very dark gray. In other words, dogs see the colors of the world as basically yellow, blue and gray. They see the colors green, yellow and orange as yellowish, and they see violet and blue as blue. Blue-green is seen as a gray.

            http://www.psychologytoday.com/...

            IOW, they CAN distinguish Grey and Blue, more so especially at close ranges, in the context of the article.

            •  Yellow blue and gray (0+ / 0-)

              like black white and gray.  Responding to presence of a light intensity is not the same as differentiating.  If you watch old computer animation the screen was green and black so you had full green all black and pixilated green gray mediums.  Two colors is two colors no matter how you paint it.

              I don't care if I fall as long as someone else picks up my gun and keeps on shooting. Che Guevara

              by Paid Troll on Sun Oct 11, 2009 at 09:27:34 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  No, dogs are NOT monchromats. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                happymisanthropy

                A complete color blind individual (who sees in black, white and gray alone) cannot distinguish blue and gray. But a typical dog can. Dogs are not monchromats.

                If a total color blind can see only black, white and shades of gray, dogs can see blue (shades of blue), yellow (shades of yellow) IN ADDITION to 'gray, black and white'.

              •  Again. Your claim is false. (0+ / 0-)

                Dogs are not monochromatic.

                Which is what you originally claimed, and continue to argue...

                If you watch old computer animation the screen was green and black so you had full green all black and pixilated green gray mediums.

                This is an example of monochorme color...

                "A monochrome computer display is able to display only a single color, often green, amber, red or white, and often also shades of that color."

                "A monochromatic object or image is one whose range of colors consists of shades of a single color or hue; monochrome images in neutral colors are also known as grayscale or black-and-white."

                http://en.wikipedia.org/...

                Two colors is two colors no matter how you paint it.

                Dogs don't see in monochrome, however much you may wish. They see in blue scale and yellow scale (and their combination) IN ADDITION to a mere gray scale.

              •  Having had a child tested (0+ / 0-)

                Being able to distinguish between a blue and a yellow object of the same intensity (would show up as the same "gray" object in B&W) is not the same thing as only being able to tell if an object is dark or light.  The wolf "rainbow" doesn't mention black or white for the same reason ours doesn't, because black is the absence of light, and white is a mixture of all light spectra.

    •  Brown eyes come from melanin (0+ / 0-)

      whick blocks UV from skin, so I assume it works the same in eyes. Arctic wolves could get along with blue eyes; tropical wolves (if there are any?) would be better off with brown.

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