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View Diary: How Regulation came to be: The Hotel Fires of 1946 - Part II (100 comments)

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  •  no kidding (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    dsteffen, ms badger, wide eyed lib

    and I thought I had done such a good job, I'd have little patching to do.  first coat of primer and it's like looking at the moon's surface.

    crap crap crap crap crap crap crap

    crap

    •  What the HELL kind of joint compound... (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dsteffen, Hard to Port, wide eyed lib

      ...are you using?  More importantly, you're sanding this stuff, right?  And using a broad, smooth edge to "finish" it when it's wet?

      I'm not trying to imply that you're a noob or a moron, I've just never had this "cratering" problem you're describing and am wondering what's causing it.  Perhaps I can offer assistance...

      I just finished off a brand new wall in my wife's laundry room in the basement of our home and it's as smooth as a baby's ass.  Maybe we can slam our brains together and solve this problem for you.

      Celtic Merlin
      Carlinist

      Sorry I couldn't take your call. I'm using my cell phone to make pancakes. Please leave a message.

      by Celtic Merlin on Sun Nov 01, 2009 at 05:05:50 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Perhaps a little bit of exageration (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Celtic Merlin, wide eyed lib

        Most of the seam actually came out OK.  A few I had issues with because I tired to get fancy with a few details.  I'll learn......eventually.

        •  damn! (3+ / 0-)

          I don't know what it is tonight but between my keyboard being weird, and my usual thoughts outrunning my fingers, my last post is riddled with errors.

          Most seams came out OK.  not so much craters as skips and imperfections around some of the more fancy details I tried

          •  Do you have a broad straightedge to use? (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            dsteffen, Hard to Port

            I just cut a finished wallboard wall into an 80-year-old block wall - what a pain in the ass!  The block wall is nowhere in the neighborhood of smooth or flat.  The finished wall looks like it disappears into the block wall - it's really cool.  Having a broad straightedge is a big help.  It makes for alot less sanding, and you usually end up with a nice, smooth joint between wallboard sheets.

            If you're getting skips, etc. - check the edge of what you're using to "finish" the joint compound.  Avoid plastic straightedges as they're notoriously prone to nicks and dents in the edge.  Also, when you go for the final finish stroke, rake your edge tool back hard, making it about 20 to 30 degrees off the surface of the wallboard.  Some guys will even use a spray bottle to GENTLY re-wet the joint compound or even their edge tool.  Shit gets smooth THEN, brother!

            Seriously, if you're having a problem that you're not sure how to avoid, let me know.  Also, I'm really curious about what these "fancy details" are that you're trying!

            Celtic Merlin
            Carlinist

            Sorry I couldn't take your call. I'm using my cell phone to make pancakes. Please leave a message.

            by Celtic Merlin on Sun Nov 01, 2009 at 05:43:45 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Thanks for the tips. (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              dsteffen, Celtic Merlin

              most of the details involve curved surfaces, and some built ins that will later hold entertainment equipment and so forth, but most are simply the boxes built around the utilities on the ceilings plus one for the looks and to define a space in the room (i.e. hobby/office space from the family room/entertainment area).  I also had a couple of 45 degree angles, which i figured would be a piece of cake, but turned out to vex me to get them right.

              I tend to be a bit of a perfectionist when I start, then I run into some tiny isue, and just get frustrated and it goes south from there.

              I have a couple of bedrooms and a bath to finish so I'll try your suggestions and see what happens

              •  Okay. Here's what you may need: (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                dsteffen, Hard to Port

                Having the proper equipment makes these jobs a helluva lot easier to finish off with a professional look to them.  Using them the right way helps, too.  :0)

                You should have:

                1. A 2" wide putty knife
                1. At least one (two is better) 6" broadknife
                1. A 12" straightedge

                The first two tools on the list should be somewhat flexible.  The foot-long straightedge should be stiff and come with a handle nearly as wide as the blade.  The blade should stick out about an inch or so from the handle and be a little bit wider than the handle.

                Use the 2" knife for getting joint compound into small areas - corners, around electrical boxes, that sort of thing.  The 4" knife is good for applying joint compound to large areas and smoothing most things smaller than a wallboard joint.  The wide straightedge is for finishing wallboard joints.

                Don't use the "light" versions of spackling, joint compound, or plaster patch.  Joint compound is the product of choice for most jobs, especially large ones like you've been doing.  

                The only other product I usually use is called "Ready Patch".  It tends to shrink some, but the finish you can get with it on an already hard wall is amazing.  It's too expensive to use for finishing wallboard joints, but it'll smooth out a crappy joint job really well.

                Before you get too involved with the next project, get ahold of me.  My e-mail addy is in my DKos profile.

                And stay the Hell off of those big red trucks - that shit's dangerous!  :0)

                Celtic Merlin
                Carlinist

                Sorry I couldn't take your call. I'm using my cell phone to make pancakes. Please leave a message.

                by Celtic Merlin on Sun Nov 01, 2009 at 06:33:00 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

            •  On the other hand (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              dsteffen, Celtic Merlin

              I textured the ceilings using that splatter gun and I bought myself one of those lexon knives.  it came out pretty good, I was pretty pleased with myself.  The only downside is it was kind of messy.

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