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View Diary: Is "No" on "No" part of the problem? (30 comments)

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  •  It only cuts both ways if: (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    soms
    1. there are equal number of voters on both sides or
    1. equal number of confused voters or
    1. equal number of voters trying to figure out what to do.

    If you're ruled by your pastor/priest, you may be much more automatic and do exactly what you're told -- Vote Yes! for these people wouldn't be a thought-out position but a command that would be obeyed.
    But most supporters of gay rights are not so rule-bound and therefore may start with their position (I'm for gay rights!) and then get confused about which way to vote.

    If, in our efforts to win, we become as dishonest as our opponents on the right, we don't deserve to triumph.

    by Tamar on Wed Nov 04, 2009 at 07:45:54 AM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  Not everyone is ruled by a pastor or priest (1+ / 0-)
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      Tamar

      Sometimes prejudice against gays and lesbians is so strong that people ignore what their pastors, priests, or religious education teachers tell them.

      I teach religion in a Catholic high school, and a student brought up gay marriage.  Most students were against it (I'm in the Deep south).  It wasn't until the very end of class when I was able to connect a new idea back to the discussion of gay marriage at the beginning of class that some students had a look of "Wow, I hadn't thought of it that way."

      Some students had said that people who are very different should change or leave.  By the end of class, after talking about some other topics, I reminded them of a guiding moral principle in Christianity, "Treat others the way you want to be treated."  So I asked them, "If you were the one who's different, would you want to be asked to change?"  Then the look of "Wow, I hadn't thought of it that way" appeared on a few faces.  Then the bell rang.

      It's a start.  A very small one, but a start.

      •  you sound like a terrific teacher (0+ / 0-)

        I wasn't saying that all religious people are automatons, just that there are likely to be more people with rigid adherence to rules among the religious right than in other groups.  
        I had a sociology professor in college (many decades ago!) who said that when Stalin signed the pact with Hitler, a lot of members of the American Communist Party left the party and joined the Catholic church.  His point was that orthodoxy knows is not limited to one particular ideology -- it's the need to follow a set of strict rules.  While there's certainly orthodoxy on the left (I read examples of it right on this website!), the more organized and populous orthodoxy these days is the Christian right-wing.  (Jews have plenty of orthodoxy, but it's usually only political in the United States in areas that directly affect their parochial (pun intended) interests, e.g, getting public money to fund their schools -- they're a relatively self-centered and purposely isolated group in this country).

        If, in our efforts to win, we become as dishonest as our opponents on the right, we don't deserve to triumph.

        by Tamar on Wed Nov 04, 2009 at 09:00:27 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  whoops -- should be: (0+ / 0-)

          "orthodoxy is not limited"

          If, in our efforts to win, we become as dishonest as our opponents on the right, we don't deserve to triumph.

          by Tamar on Wed Nov 04, 2009 at 09:01:58 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

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